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Herbert and Pencroft speaking little, for the difficulties of the way were great, advanced very slowly, and after walking for an hour they had scarcely gone more than a mile. As yet the hunt had not been successful. However, some birds sang and fluttered in the foliage, and appeared very timid, as if man had inspired them with an instinctive fear. Among others, Herbert described, in a marshy part of the forest, a bird with a long pointed beak, closely resembling the king-fisher, but its plumage was not fine, though of a metallic brilliancy. Just then, a stone cleverly thrown by the boy, struck the creature on the wing, but the blow did not disable it, and the jacamar ran off and disappeared in an instant.

We shall catch it another day! As the hunters advanced, the trees were found to be more scattered, many being magnificent, but none bore eatable fruit. Pencroft searched in vain for some of those precious palm-trees which are employed in so many ways in domestic life, and which have been found as far as the fortieth parallel in the Northern Hemisphere, and to the thirty-fifth only in the Southern Hemisphere. But this forest was only composed of coniferae, such as deodaras, already recognized by Herbert, and Douglas pine, similar to those which grow on the northwest coast of America, and splendid firs, measuring a hundred and fifty feet in height.

At this moment a flock of birds, of a small size and pretty plumage, with long glancing tails, dispersed themselves among the branches strewing their feathers, which covered the ground as with fine down. The sailor and the lad, creeping among the grass, arrived at the foot of a tree, whose lower branches were covered with little birds. The couroucous were waiting the passage of insects which served for their nourishment.

Their feathery feet could be seen clasping the slender twigs which supported them. The hunters then rose, and using their sticks like scythes, they mowed down whole rows of these couroucous, who never thought of flying away, and stupidly allowed themselves to be knocked off. A hundred were already heaped on the ground, before the others made up their minds to fly. We have only to put out our hands and take it! The sailor having strung the couroucous like larks on flexible twigs, they then continued their exploration.

The stream here made a bend towards the south, but this detour was probably not prolonged for the river must have its source in the mountain, and be supplied by the melting of the snow which covered the sides of the central cone. The particular object of their expedition was, as has been said, to procure the greatest possible quantity of game for the inhabitants of the Chimneys.

It must be acknowledged that as yet this object had not been attained. Suddenly a loud trumpet call resounded through the forest. This strange and sonorous cry was produced by a game bird called grouse in the United States. They soon saw several couples, whose plumage was rich chestnut-brown mottled with dark brown, and tail of the same color. Herbert recognized the males by the two wing-like appendages raised on the neck. Pencroft determined to get hold of at least one of these gallinaceae, which were as large as a fowl, and whose flesh is better than that of a pullet.

But it was difficult, for they would not allow themselves to be approached. Pencroft had found among the grass half a dozen grouse nests, each having three or four eggs. He took great care not to touch these nests, to which their proprietors would not fail to return. It was around these that he meant to stretch his lines, not snares, but real fishing-lines. He took Herbert to some distance from the nests, and there prepared his singular apparatus with all the care which a disciple of Izaak Walton would have used.

Herbert watched the work with great interest, though rather doubting its success. The lines were made of fine creepers, fastened one to the other, of the length of fifteen or twenty feet. Thick, strong thorns, the points bent back which were supplied from a dwarf acacia bush were fastened to the ends of the creepers, by way of hooks. Large red worms, which were crawling on the ground, furnished bait. This done, Pencroft, passing among the grass and concealing himself skillfully, placed the end of his lines armed with hooks near the grouse nests; then he returned, took the other ends and hid with Herbert behind a large tree.

There they both waited patiently; though, it must be said, that Herbert did not reckon much on the success of the inventive Pencroft. A whole half-hour passed, but then, as the sailor had surmised, several couple of grouse returned to their nests. They walked along, pecking the ground, and not suspecting in any way the presence of the hunters, who, besides, had taken care to place themselves to leeward of the gallinaceae.

The lad felt at this moment highly interested. He held his breath, and Pencroft, his eyes staring, his mouth open, his lips advanced, as if about to taste a piece of grouse, scarcely breathed. Meanwhile, the birds walked about the hooks, without taking any notice of them. Pencroft then gave little tugs which moved the bait as if the worms had been still alive. The sailor undoubtedly felt much greater anxiety than does the fisherman, for he does not see his prey coming through the water. The jerks attracted the attention of the gallinaceae, and they attacked the hooks with their beaks.

Three voracious grouse swallowed at the same moment bait and hook. Herbert clapped his hands. It was the first time that he had ever seen birds taken with a line, but the sailor modestly confessed that it was not his first attempt, and that besides he could not claim the merit of invention. The grouse were fastened by their claws, and Pencroft, delighted at not having to appear before their companions with empty hands, and observing that the day had begun to decline, judged it best to return to their dwelling.

by Thomas B. Costain

Gideon Spilett was standing motionless on the shore, his arms crossed, gazing over the sea, the horizon of which was lost towards the east in a thick black cloud which was spreading rapidly towards the zenith. The wind was already strong, and increased with the decline of day. The whole sky was of a threatening aspect, and the first symptoms of a violent storm were clearly visible. Herbert entered the Chimneys, and Pencroft went towards the reporter. The latter, deeply absorbed, did not see him approach. A good fire crackled on the hearth.

Herbert had just thrown on an armful of dry wood, and the flame cast a bright light into the darkest parts of the passage. Pencroft immediately began to prepare the dinner. It appeared best to introduce something solid into the bill of fare, for all needed to get up their strength. The strings of couroucous were kept for the next day, but they plucked a couple of grouse, which were soon spitted on a stick, and roasting before a blazing fire. At seven in the evening Neb had not returned.

The prolonged absence of the Negro made Pencroft very uneasy. It was to be feared that he had met with an accident on this unknown land, or that the unhappy fellow had been driven to some act of despair. But Herbert drew very different conclusions from this absence. Also, everything new must be to the advantage of Cyrus Harding. Why had Neb not returned unless hope still detained him? Perhaps he had found some mark, a footstep, a trace which had put him in the right path. Perhaps he was at this moment on a certain track.

Perhaps even he was near his master. Thus the lad reasoned. Thus he spoke. His companions let him talk. The reporter alone approved with a gesture. But what Pencroft thought most probable was, that Neb had pushed his researches on the shore farther than the day before, and that he had not as yet had time to return. Herbert, however, agitated by vague presentiments, several times manifested an intention to go to meet Neb.

But Pencroft assured him that that would be a useless course, that in the darkness and deplorable weather he could not find any traces of Neb, and that it would be much better to wait. If Neb had not made his appearance by the next day, Pencroft would not hesitate to join him in his search. Bad weather now set in. A furious gale from the southeast passed over the coast. The sea roared as it beat over the reef. Heavy rain was dashed by the storm into particles like dust.

Ragged masses of vapor drove along the beach, on which the tormented shingles sounded as if poured out in cart- loads, while the sand raised by the wind added as it were mineral dust to that which was liquid, and rendered the united attack insupportable. The smoke from the fireplace was also driven back through the opening, filling the passages and rendering them uninhabitable. Therefore, as the grouse were cooked, Pencroft let the fire die away, and only preserved a few embers buried under the ashes. As to going to meet him, or attempting to find him, it was impossible.

The game constituted the only dish at supper; the meat was excellent, and Pencroft and Herbert, whose long excursion had rendered them very hungry, devoured it with infinite satisfaction. Their meal concluded, each retired to the corner in which he had rested the preceding night, and Herbert was not long in going to sleep near the sailor, who had stretched himself beside the fireplace. Outside, as the night advanced, the tempest also increased in strength, until it was equal to that which had carried the prisoners from Richmond to this land in the Pacific.

The tempests which are frequent during the seasons of the equinox, and which are so prolific in catastrophes, are above all terrible over this immense ocean, which opposes no obstacle to their fury. No description can give an idea of the terrific violence of the gale as it beat upon the unprotected coast. Happily the pile of rocks which formed the Chimneys was solid. It was composed of enormous blocks of granite, a few of which, insecurely balanced, seemed to tremble on their foundations, and Pencroft could feel rapid quiverings under his head as it rested on the rock.

But he repeated to himself, and rightly, that there was nothing to fear, and that their retreat would not give way. However he heard the noise of stones torn from the summit of the plateau by the wind, falling down on to the beach. A few even rolled on to the upper part of the Chimneys, or flew off in fragments when they were projected perpendicularly. Twice the sailor rose and intrenched himself at the opening of the passage, so as to take a look in safety at the outside. But there was nothing to be feared from these showers, which were not considerable, and he returned to his couch before the fireplace, where the embers glowed beneath the ashes.

Notwithstanding the fury of the hurricane, the uproar of the tempest, the thunder, and the tumult, Herbert slept profoundly. Sleep at last took possession of Pencroft, whom a seafaring life had habituated to anything. Gideon Spilett alone was kept awake by anxiety. He reproached himself with not having accompanied Neb. It was evident that he had not abandoned all hope. The presentiments which had troubled Herbert did not cease to agitate him also. His thoughts were concentrated on Neb. Why had Neb not returned? He tossed about on his sandy couch, scarcely giving a thought to the struggle of the elements.

Now and then, his eyes, heavy with fatigue, closed for an instant, but some sudden thought reopened them almost immediately. Meanwhile the night advanced, and it was perhaps two hours from morning, when Pencroft, then sound asleep, was vigorously shaken. It is Top! They had great difficulty in getting out.

The wind drove them back. But at last they succeeded, and could only remain standing by leaning against the rocks. They looked about, but could not speak. The darkness was intense. The sea, the sky, the land were all mingled in one black mass. Not a speck of light was visible.

The reporter and his companions remained thus for a few minutes, overwhelmed by the wind, drenched by the rain, blinded by the sand. Then, in a pause of the tumult, they again heard the barking, which they found must be at some distance. It could only be Top! But was he alone or accompanied? He was most probably alone, for, if Neb had been with him, he would have made his way more directly towards the Chimneys.

An instant after he issued with a lighted fagot, which he threw into the darkness, whistling shrilly. It appeared as if this signal had been waited for; the barking immediately came nearer, and soon a dog bounded into the passage. Pencroft, Herbert, and Spilett entered after him. It was indeed Top, a magnificent Anglo-Norman, who derived from these two races crossed the swiftness of foot and the acuteness of smell which are the preeminent qualities of coursing dogs.

It was the dog of the engineer, Cyrus Harding. But he was alone! Neither Neb nor his master accompanied him! How was it that his instinct had guided him straight to the Chimneys, which he did not know? It appeared inexplicable, above all, in the midst of this black night and in such a tempest! But what was still more inexplicable was, that Top was neither tired, nor exhausted, nor even soiled with mud or sand! Pencroft did not make any objection. Pencroft carefully covered the embers on the hearth.

He placed a few pieces of wood among them, so as to keep in the fire until their return. Then, preceded by the dog, who seemed to invite them by short barks to come with him, and followed by the reporter and the boy, he dashed out, after having put up in his handkerchief the remains of the supper. The storm was then in all its violence, and perhaps at its height.

Not a single ray of light from the moon pierced through the clouds. To follow a straight course was difficult. They did so. The reporter and Herbert walked behind the dog, and the sailor brought up the rear. It was impossible to exchange a word. The rain was not very heavy, but the wind was terrific. However, one circumstance favored the seaman and his two companions. The wind being southeast, consequently blew on their backs.

The clouds of sand, which otherwise would have been insupportable, from being received behind, did not in consequence impede their progress. In short, they sometimes went faster than they liked, and had some difficulty in keeping their feet; but hope gave them strength, for it was not at random that they made their way along the shore. They had no doubt that Neb had found his master, and that he had sent them the faithful dog. But was the engineer living, or had Neb only sent for his companions that they might render the last duties to the corpse of the unfortunate Harding?

After having passed the precipice, Herbert, the reporter, and Pencroft prudently stepped aside to stop and take breath. The turn of the rocks sheltered them from the wind, and they could breathe after this walk or rather run of a quarter of an hour. They could now hear and reply to each other, and the lad having pronounced the name of Cyrus Harding, Top gave a few short barks, as much as to say that his master was saved.

They once more set out. The tide began to rise, and urged by the wind it threatened to be unusually high, as it was a spring tide. Great billows thundered against the reef with such violence that they probably passed entirely over the islet, then quite invisible. The mole no longer protected the coast, which was directly exposed to the attacks of the open sea. As soon as the sailor and his companions left the precipice, the wind struck them again with renewed fury. Though bent under the gale they walked very quickly, following Top, who did not hesitate as to what direction to take.

They ascended towards the north, having on their left an interminable extent of billows, which broke with a deafening noise, and on their right a dark country, the aspect of which it was impossible to guess. But they felt that it was comparatively flat, for the wind passed completely over them, without being driven back as it was when it came in contact with the cliff. The clouds were slightly raised, and the wind, though less damp, was very sharp and cold.

Insufficiently protected by their clothing, Pencroft, Herbert and Spilett suffered cruelly, but not a complaint escaped their lips. They were determined to follow Top, wherever the intelligent animal wished to lead them. At the zenith, where the fog was less thick, gray shades bordered the clouds; under an opaque belt, a luminous line clearly traced the horizon. The crests of the billows were tipped with a wild light, and the foam regained its whiteness.

At the same time on the left the hilly parts of the coast could be seen, though very indistinctly. The clouds rapidly lifted. The seaman and his companions were then about six miles from the Chimneys. They were following a very flat shore bounded by a reef of rocks, whose heads scarcely emerged from the sea, for they were in deep water. On the left, the country appeared to be one vast extent of sandy downs, bristling with thistles. There was no cliff, and the shore offered no resistance to the ocean but a chain of irregular hillocks.

Here and there grew two or three trees, inclined towards the west, their branches projecting in that direction. Quite behind, in the southwest, extended the border of the forest. At this moment, Top became very excited. He ran forward, then returned, and seemed to entreat them to hasten their steps. The dog then left the beach, and guided by his wonderful instinct, without showing the least hesitation, went straight in among the downs. They followed him. The country appeared an absolute desert. Not a living creature was to be seen.

The downs, the extent of which was large, were composed of hillocks and even of hills, very irregularly distributed. They resembled a Switzerland modeled in sand, and only an amazing instinct could have possibly recognized the way. Five minutes after having left the beach, the reporter and his two companions arrived at a sort of excavation, hollowed out at the back of a high mound.

There Top stopped, and gave a loud, clear bark. Spilett, Herbert, and Pencroft dashed into the cave. Neb did not reply. Spilett and the sailor turned pale. Herbert clasped his hands, and remained motionless. The poor Negro, absorbed in his grief, evidently had neither seen his companions nor heard the sailor speak. A minute — an age! Neb had raised himself a little and gazed without seeing.

Despair had completely changed his countenance. He could scarcely be recognized, exhausted with fatigue, broken with grief. He believed his master was dead. Pencroft knelt in his turn beside the engineer, he also heard a throbbing, and even felt a slight breath on his cheek. Herbert at a word from the reporter ran out to look for water. He found, a hundred feet off, a limpid stream, which seemed to have been greatly increased by the rains, and which filtered through the sand; but nothing in which to put the water, not even a shell among the downs.

The lad was obliged to content himself with dipping his handkerchief in the stream, and with it hastened back to the grotto. The cold water produced an almost immediate effect. His chest heaved and he seemed to try to speak. He undressed his master to see if he was wounded, but not so much as a bruise was to be found, either on the head, body, or limbs, which was surprising, as he must have been dashed against the rocks; even the hands were uninjured, and it was difficult to explain how the engineer showed no traces of the efforts which he must have made to get out of reach of the breakers. But the explanation would come later.

When Cyrus was able to speak he would say what had happened. The engineer, revived by this rude shampooing, moved his arm slightly and began to breathe more regularly. He was sinking from exhaustion, and certainly, had not the reporter and his companions arrived, it would have been all over with Cyrus Harding. Neb then recounted what had happened. The day before, after having left the Chimneys at daybreak, he had ascended the coast in a northerly direction, and had reached that part of the shore which he had already visited. There, without any hope he acknowledged, Neb had searched the beach, among the rocks, on the sand, for the smallest trace to guide him.

He examined particularly that part of the beach which was not covered by the high tide, for near the sea the water would have obliterated all marks. Neb did not expect to find his master living. It was for a corpse that he searched, a corpse which he wished to bury with his own hands! He sought long in vain.

This desert coast appeared never to have been visited by a human creature. The shells, those which the sea had not reached, and which might be met with by millions above high-water mark, were untouched. Not a shell was broken. Neb then resolved to walk along the beach for some miles. It was possible that the waves had carried the body to quite a distant point.

When a corpse floats a little distance from a low shore, it rarely happens that the tide does not throw it up, sooner or later. This Neb knew, and he wished to see his master again for the last time. They were very clear and went towards the downs. I followed them for a quarter of a mile, running, but taking care not to destroy them. Five minutes after, as it was getting dark, I heard the barking of a dog.

Disney, Harveytoon and Sega's Channel

It was Top, and Top brought me here, to my master! Neb ended his account by saying what had been his grief at finding the inanimate body, in which he vainly sought for the least sign of life. Now that he had found him dead he longed for him to be alive. All his efforts were useless! Nothing remained to be done but to render the last duties to the one whom he had loved so much!

Neb then thought of his companions. They, no doubt, would wish to see the unfortunate man again. Top was there. Could he not rely on the sagacity of the faithful animal? Neb several times pronounced the name of the reporter, the one among his companions whom Top knew best. We have heard how, guided by an instinct which might be looked upon almost as supernatural, Top had found them. It was unaccountable to them how Cyrus Harding, after the efforts which he must have made to escape from the waves by crossing the rocks, had not received even a scratch.

And what could not be explained either was how the engineer had managed to get to this cave in the downs, more than a mile from the shore. Rubbing had re-established the circulation of the blood. Cyrus Harding moved his arm again, then his head, and a few incomprehensible words escaped him. Neb, who was bending over him, spoke, but the engineer did not appear to hear, and his eyes remained closed.

Life was only exhibited in him by movement, his senses had not as yet been restored. Pencroft much regretted not having either fire, or the means of procuring it, for he had, unfortunately, forgotten to bring the burnt linen, which would easily have ignited from the sparks produced by striking together two flints. It was necessary to carry Harding to the Chimneys, and that as soon as possible. This was the opinion of all.

Meanwhile, the care which was lavished on the engineer brought him back to consciousness sooner than they could have expected. The water with which they wetted his lips revived him gradually. Herbert ran to the beach and returned with two large bivalve shells. The sailor concocted something which he introduced between the lips of the engineer, who eagerly drinking it opened his eyes. The engineer heard him. He recognized Neb and Spilett, then his other two companions, and his hand slightly pressed theirs.

A few words again escaped him, which showed what thoughts were, even then, troubling his brain. This time he was understood. Undoubtedly they were the same words he had before attempted to utter. They respected this sleep, and the reporter began immediately to make arrangements for transporting Harding to a more comfortable place. Neb, Herbert, and Pencroft left the cave and directed their steps towards a high mound crowned with a few distorted trees.

Arrived at the summit of the mound, Pencroft and his two companions set to work, with no other tools than their hands, to despoil of its principal branches a rather sickly tree, a sort of marine fir; with these branches they made a litter, on which, covered with grass and leaves, they could carry the engineer. The engineer was just awaking from the sleep, or rather from the drowsiness, in which they had found him.


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The color was returning to his cheeks, which till now had been as pale as death. He raised himself a little, looked around him, and appeared to ask where he was. Cyrus Harding ate a little of the grouse, and the rest was divided among his companions, who found it but a meager breakfast, for they were suffering extremely from hunger. Your litter is ready, and as soon as you feel strong enough we will carry you home. And now speak, Spilett. The reporter then told him all that had occurred.

Cyrus Harding considered. He knew very little. The wave had torn him from the balloon net. He sank at first several fathoms. On returning to the surface, in the half light, he felt a living creature struggling near him. It was Top, who had sprung to his help. He saw nothing of the balloon, which, lightened both of his weight and that of the dog, had darted away like an arrow.

There he was, in the midst of the angry sea, at a distance which could not be less than half a mile from the shore. He attempted to struggle against the billows by swimming vigorously. Top held him up by his clothes; but a strong current seized him and drove him towards the north, and after half an hour of exertion, he sank, dragging Top with him into the depths. From that moment to the moment in which he recovered to find himself in the arms of his friends he remembered nothing.

Do any of the footsteps still remain? The storm has destroyed the others. The sailor did as the engineer requested. There was no doubt about it. It was therefore Cyrus Harding who had left them on the sand. I must have walked like a somnambulist, without any knowledge of my steps, and Top must have guided me here, after having dragged me from the waves. Come, Top! Come, old dog! The magnificent animal bounded barking to his master, and caresses were lavished on him. It was agreed that there was no other way of accounting for the rescue of Cyrus Harding, and that Top deserved all the honor of the affair.

But he was obliged to lean on the sailor, or he would have fallen. The litter was brought; the transverse branches had been covered with leaves and long grass. Harding was laid on it, and Pencroft, having taken his place at one end and Neb at the other, they started towards the coast. There was a distance of eight miles to be accomplished; but, as they could not go fast, and it would perhaps be necessary to stop frequently, they reckoned that it would take at least six hours to reach the Chimneys.

The wind was still strong, but fortunately it did not rain. Although lying down, the engineer, leaning on his elbow, observed the coast, particularly inland. He did not speak, but he gazed; and, no doubt, the appearance of the country, with its inequalities of ground, its forests, its various productions, were impressed on his mind. However, after traveling for two hours, fatigue overcame him, and he slept. At half-past five the little band arrived at the precipice, and a short time after at the Chimneys. They stopped, and the litter was placed on the sand; Cyrus Harding was sleeping profoundly, and did not awake.

Pencroft, to his extreme surprise, found that the terrible storm had quite altered the aspect of the place. Important changes had occurred; great blocks of stone lay on the beach, which was also covered with a thick carpet of sea-weed, algae, and wrack. Evidently the sea, passing over the islet, had been carried right up to the foot of the enormous curtain of granite. The soil in front of the cave had been torn away by the violence of the waves. He rushed into the passage, but returned almost immediately, and stood motionless, staring at his companions. The fire was out; the drowned cinders were nothing but mud; the burnt linen, which was to have served as tinder, had disappeared!

The sea had penetrated to the end of the passages, and everything was overthrown and destroyed in the interior of the Chimneys! In a few words, Gideon Spilett, Herbert, and Neb were made acquainted with what had happened. This accident, which appeared so very serious to Pencroft, produced different effects on the companions of the honest sailor. Neb, in his delight at having found his master, did not listen, or rather, did not care to trouble himself with what Pencroft was saying. What had Pencroft to say? He could say nothing, for, in the bottom of his heart he shared the confidence which his companions had in Cyrus Harding.

The engineer was to them a microcosm, a compound of every science, a possessor of all human knowledge. It was better to be with Cyrus in a desert island, than without him in the most flourishing town in the United States. With him they could want nothing; with him they would never despair. While in the palanquin, however, the engineer had again relapsed into unconsciousness, which the jolting to which he had been subjected during his journey had brought on, so that they could not now appeal to his ingenuity.

The supper must necessarily be very meager. In fact, all the grouse flesh had been consumed, and there no longer existed any means of cooking more game. Besides, the couroucous which had been reserved had disappeared. They must consider what was to be done. First of all, Cyrus Harding was carried into the central passage. There they managed to arrange for him a couch of sea-weed which still remained almost dry.

The deep sleep which had overpowered him would no doubt be more beneficial to him than any nourishment. Night had closed in, and the temperature, which had modified when the wind shifted to the northwest, again became extremely cold. Also, the sea having destroyed the partitions which Pencroft had put up in certain places in the passages, the Chimneys, on account of the draughts, had become scarcely habitable. Supper, this evening, was of course composed of the inevitable lithodomes, of which Herbert and Neb picked up a plentiful supply on the beach.

However, to these molluscs, the lad added some edible sea-weed, which he gathered on high rocks, whose sides were only washed by the sea at the time of high tides.


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  • This sea-weed, which belongs to the order of Fucacae, of the genus Sargassum, produces, when dry, a gelatinous matter, rich and nutritious. The reporter and his companions, after having eaten a quantity of lithodomes, sucked the sargassum, of which the taste was very tolerable. It is used in parts of the East very considerably by the natives. The sailor, extremely vexed, tried in all sorts of ways to procure fire. Neb helped him in this work. We also have amazing treats for vegetarian diet. Using a lot of organic and locally produced ingredients in order to bring you a prime gastronomic experience.

    Serious eats for not so serious people. We take table reservations for dining customers. We also have a cabinet room that fits 26 people. Beer lovers, just walk in! Group of ppl? Ask for cabinet room! Private interment is planned at a later date for family and close friends. Contribution envelopes will be available at the service. A reception for family and friends will immediately follow in the Farnum Room of the St. Marks Parish House, next to the church. Laliberte died March 31, , at the Veterans' Affairs hospital at Togus after a brief illness.

    Born June 18, , to Perley J. He was a devoted family man and was active in the Augusta community. He enjoyed many activities, such as cribbage, swimming, music and activities at St. Michael Parish. He participated in Meals on Wheels and thoroughly enjoyed it. His happiest times were spent listening to music and singing with his family.

    Lawrence worked most of his life at Statler Tissue Co. He was predeceased by his loving parents; a brother, Gerard J. Laliberte; and by a special grandson, Lee M. Hilaire, of Winthrop. He is survived by his beloved wife of 58 years, Arlene M. Hilaire, of Winthrop, Gloria Morrill and her husband, Timothy, of Richmond, Louisa Lajoie and her husband, Michael, of Pittston, and Perley Laliberte and his wife, Laurie, of North Yarmouth; 13 grandchildren, two great-grandchildren and several nieces and nephews, all of whom he loved dearly.

    There will be no public visitation. A funeral Mass will be at 11 a. Friday, April 3, at St. Augustine Church in Augusta. Burial and committal services will immediately follow at the new Maine Veterans' Memorial Cemetery. A celebration of life will follow at the Le Club Calumet in Augusta. Michael Parish in Augusta. At the age of six, Larry went to live on the Vickery Farm on in Auburn.

    He joined the military at 17 and was trained as a machine gun instructor for the United States Army. He was well-known in the community for his work as a parking attendant at Graziano's Restaurant where he sang to the patrons accompanied by Phil House. He was also well-known at L. Bean as "The Popcorn Man" as well as his driving the Bean Boot in many parades both before and after he retired in Throughout the day, Larry was visited by many members of his family and friends.

    But, he is perhaps best remembered for his exquisite sense of humor -- he always had a joke ready for anyone who wanted to listen or not. Larry enjoyed his computer and the games especially winning his grandson loaded for him, particularly bowling and golf Larry's family would like to thank the compassionate staff of the Hospice House for their care and understanding, and his friends Walter and Margaret Bubier. Committal will be held privately. She looked forward to the area agricultural fairs in the fall and the horse pulling events. She enjoyed baking and was especially skilled at pie and bread making.

    An avid walker, her other interests included traveling, gardening, knitting, and reading. She loved her granddaughter Kelly and spent many wonderful hours with her.

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    Her cats Lacey and Lucy were also an important part of her life. Marjorie was recently employed by Hannaford Brothers in Waterboro, Maine where she made many new friends. Often she could be found before or after work helping to maintain the flower gardens. She is survived by. Interment will be later in the spring at Kenney Cemetery in Brooks, Maine.

    She lived a full life and will be remembered by all for her dynamic personality and her great sense of humor. She then opened and operated her own beauty shop in Mechanic Falls. She married Phil Bower in and enjoyed a fairytale love affair marriage with him until his death, 16 years later. Marian was an avid golfer in her day, winning B flight at Fairlawn Golf Course where she was a member. She was also an accomplished seamstress and knitter, and showered her family with the fruits of her labors.

    She always had a smile and a joke, right up to the end. She epitomized the "Glass Half Full" and has imparted that attitude on all she encountered. Her family extends its undying gratitude to the Schooner Estate Residential Care staff, who for the past 7 years, have filled Marian's days with love, laughter and amazing personal care. She was predeceased by her husband, Philip Nichols Bower, in and by her grandson, Darren Nyberg, in Family and friends are invited to pay their respects from 3 - 5. A memorial service will immediately follow, from 5 - 6.

    Interment at Mount Auburn Cemetery will occur later this spring when the grass is green and the flowers are up. Auburn — William. Marion R. Services will be held privately in the spring. Augusta-Kathryn A. Norton, 48, of State St. Kathy was an avid swimmer and had accumulated many swimming medals. She was also a member of Alcoholics Anonymous. Andrews Catholic Church in Augusta. Augusta, ME He was married to Irene B. Webster on January 7, who he is survived by. He worked in the construction business all his life traveling throughout the United States.

    After retirement he enjoyed fishing at the Forks with his wife, golfing and woodworking. He was pre-deceased by brothers Kenneth and Philip. Freeport-Florence A. Kierstead was born in Freeport on April 10, the daughter of Carrol. She was a shoe worker all her life, retiring from Eastland Shoe in In Freeport Rescue opened to ladies, she was the first female to join and served for 22 years as a member of the rescue and company where she served as vice president. She Started the Viel of Life which is a medical history of patients.

    She worked for Freeport, Pownal and Durham before retiring from rescue in She received 3 plaques for; life member, chiefs, and memorial, which she was proud of. In she gave Chuck Arthur a little push, so that Freeport got the first charter little league soft ball for the State of Maine. She bowled for a number of years. She also worked as a waitress for a number o. She was also caregiver to two families in this area. She worked with special Olympics for six years, she received a plaque from Olympic Headquarters for her years of service.

    Family and friends are invited to visit from 11 to noon on Wednesday the 4th with service commencing at noon at the Freeport Fire Department on Main St. Burial will take place in the spring. South China-Judith M. Mahon, 63, o. Bradford Ln. Judith worked for many years as a hairdresser in the Augusta area, co-owning Mirror Images in Augusta.

    After retirement she continued to work part time as a traveling hairdresser at many local nursing homes. She also worked part time at L. Judith enjoyed spending time with her grandchildren, traveling and shopping. Judith was predeceased by her parents and a son Jody Mahon. A funeral service will take place on Thursday, March 5th at the Church at 11am. Burial will take place in the spring in Dixmont. Scarborough-Donald Phillip Looby, 80, passed away peacefully on Wednesday, February 11, at his home after a long illness. He was born November 29, in Malone, New York, the son o.

    Harold and Gladys Looby. He graduated from high school in Rutland, Vermont and then served in the U. He was employed by the Maine Central Railroad as V. He enjoyed traveling with his wife Carolyn during his retirement years and also enjoyed the company of his grandchildren. Services will be held privately this summer in Churubusco, New York were Mr. Looby's Irish Ancestors are buried in the graveyard that was donated to the village of Churubusco by his great grandfather William and where Donald spent many happy summers at his grandmother's and grandfather'.

    The son of Richard E. He attended schools in Northborough, Mass. He was a resident of Lewiston, Maine for over 21 years. He passed into eternal life after a courageous battle with cancer on February 13, He loved sports, camping and the ocean. He traveled extensively in the U. He formed fast friendships thanks to his charm, wit, generosity of spirit, and ability to connect to others in very human terms.

    He faced the illness that ravaged his body with dignity, great heart, and even humor. He was deeply loved and will be missed by Mary, his wife of 22 years, and by the children of whom he was so proud. He also leaves, a sister, two brothers, a large extended family, and the many friends he made wherever he went. Family and friends are invited to attend visiting hours on Thursday, February 19th from 4 to 8pm at Funeral Alternatives Group 25 Tampa St.

    Lewiston, Me Mary Ann married William H. Bray Sr. She moved to Maine 4 years ago to be with her daughters, grandchildren, and great grandchildren. She enjoyed walking, cooking, visits to the ocean and picking up seashells, and especially spending time with her family. Bray Jr. She was predeceased by her beloved husband William. Arthur Alexander Windecker, Jr. By he had passed all of the actuarial exams and had become a Fellow of the Society of Actuaries.

    He served a year in Washington and a year in Hawaii. He retired from the Equitable in and worked part time for the next several years doing actuarial consulting for a consortium of European insurance companies. He was widowed a second time in He also served as Clerk of Session for several years. In Auburn, he was a member of the United Methodist Church. In his middle years and well into retirement, Arthur enjoyed skiing with his family, playing bridge, traveling with Beatrice, and vacationing at the family summer cottage on Lake Pocasset in Wayne.

    He was a devoted husband and had a strong sense of the duty of supporting his wife and family. Arthur is predeceased by his two wives, his brother Walter Windecker, and his two sisters, Florence Windecker Stevenson and Marion Windecker. He is survived by his two sons, his daughter-in-law, Patricia Windecker, his two granddaughters, Karin Windecker and Laura Windecker, and many nephews and nieces and their children.

    He is also survived by his two stepdaughters, Beverly Leyden of Hebron and Arolyn Lake of North Bridgeton, and their children and grandchildren. Interment will be later in the spring at Mt. Auburn Cemetery where Beatrice is also buried. Box , Winthrop, Maine, www. George E. George was an avid ham radio operator from the age of 13 when he received his first call sign, K1MON. In later years, after relocating to Maine, he changed his call sign to W1ME. George was particularly interested in amateur satellite operation and contacts with astronauts aboard Mir and the ISS.

    In Feb , he set up his radio station at the Rockland, ME high school as part of a PenBay radio club activity and contacted the International Space Station, allowing high school students to communicate with the astronauts aboard. It was one of the highlights of his amateur radio involvement. He served in the U. Army from with 27 months being served in Viet Nam. He was employed by Verizon, originally New England Telephone, for 31 years as a central office technician. George was also a private pilot for many years and a former member of the Baldeagles Flying Club in Portland.

    George is survived by his wife of 39 years, Caroline P. She was surrounded by her loving family. She was born in Greenbush on January 28th, the daughter of Charles Sr. Esther worked for many years in the shoe factories and in the yarn industry. She enjoyed knitting for her friends and family.

    She also enjoyed reading and spending time with her family and friends. She was predeceased by her beloved husband William H. Keene Sr. Lisbon-Ashlee M. Stone, 12, of David St. She was born on May Ash was a 7th grader at the Sugg Middle School where she was very active in many clubs and organizations; a Jr. Ash enjoyed being with family, sleep-overs, her computer, texting, bible camps, movies and just doing girl stuff. Ashlee was vibrant, thoughtful and full of life.

    She loved people, her siblings, was her mothers best friend and touched everyone she met. Lisbon, with a funeral service commencing at 1pm at the Church. Lisbon, Me to help defray the funeral costs. Arnold E. His family lived in Danforth until when they moved to Freeport. He worked in the woods, a textile mill in Lisbon Falls and Eastland Shoe.

    He worked for the Maine Department of Transportation until he retired in He and his wife Lydia enjoyed spending time with family, day trips, eating out and camping. Family, children and pets meant a lot to him. He is survived by Lydia his wife of 33 years, his daughter Teri C. There will be no funeral services. Arrangements by Funeral Alternatives Group, Yarmouth. She is survived by her son Lee Turner; sister Lillian Hill; caretaker Mary Chamberlain; many grandchildren and great grandchildren. She was predeceased by William J. There will not be any services at this time. Auburn — Omer J. Pomerleau, 65, of Conell Street, Auburn passed away peacefully on January 11, at Hospice House after a courageous battle with cancer.

    Omer married Sharon Hutchinson on Oct. Omer served our county in the Navy and was in Europe during his extended tour. He was dedicated to his work as the plant manager at Bottoms USA for 23 years. He enjoyed woodworking and spending time with family and friends. Omer was a member of the American Legion.

    Family and friends may call 11am until the time of service on Thursday, January 15, at The First Assembly of God, 70 Hogan Road, Lewiston where a memorial service will begin at noon with the Rev. Donald Cougle officiating Interment will be in the spring. He was born Feb. He left school early in life to help support the family by working in the woods with his stepfather. He later worked at a saw mill in North Anson and drove a pulp truck, before going to work for Saunder Brothers in Westbrook, where he eventually retired.

    Frank married Florence Tibbetts March 14, , and they spent many happy years together. He enjoyed hunting, fishing, tinkering in his shed and going dancing with Florence. He always looked forward to the local fairs, especially the Farmington Fair and visiting family and friends in the North New Portland area. The family would like to thank the staff at Coastal Manor in Yarmouth for the wonderful care and attention they gave Frank while he was there.

    Thank you also to the best neighbors anyone could ask for: Mary and Newton Towle, who helped Frank and Florence by mowing their lawn, plowing their driveway and many other acts of kindness too numerous to list. Lewiston — Jeanne Kay Fortin, 59, passed away on January 10, at a local hospital with her loving husband at her side. Jeanne married Michael Fortin on October 19, They enjoyed many activities together including fishing and target shooting. She was a member of East Auburn Baptist Church.

    Jeanne was a friendly, kind woman who delighted in her herb and vegetable gardens, costal Maine, and seafood. Jeanne will be sadly missed by her extended family and friends.

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    Lewiston — Gloria R. She was employed at Hannaford for 34 years as a cashier, retiring in June Gloria loved life and enjoyed spending time with her family and friends. Her favorite things to do were going to the ocean at Harpswell and Bailey Island, and her senior bus trips to see plays and special attractions. She was a generous and caring person, always lending a helping hand. She will be sadly missed by her family and friends, and by her loving cat, Rascal. She was predeceased by her parents, husband Alden S. Palmer I. Palmer II, and sister Carolyn Banks.

    Prudence L. They were married in Prudy spent more than 20 years as a nurse on the pediatric ward at mercy Hospital, most often working the shift. She was adored by both patients and their families for her kindness and encouraging bedside manner. During her retirement years, Prudy devoted much time and energy to the charitable works of the Portland Emblem Club. Prudy was predeceased by her parents and siblings.

    Funeral services will be private. Falmouth, Maine-Stanley "Jack" Gifford, 83, died peacefully in his sleep on Friday, December 19, after a happy and full life. A family remembrance is planned for the spring. Marilyn 'Dee' Gould July 13, Dec. A true friend and mother to everyone who passed through her door, Dee will always be remembered as a woman who opened her heart and her home to all who knew her. While attending the University of Pennsylvania and earning her bachelor's degree in education, she met Charles S. Gould, a young, dashing merchant mariner on a blind date arranged by her Alpha Chi Omega sorority sister.

    Dee taught kindergarten and Charlie worked towards his master's degree at Rutgers University. In , Charlie, a sales representative at Dupont Chemical, was transferred to Maine and they settled there after a brief stint in Texas. In , they moved to their home in South Freeport and raised their four children.

    Dee was a member of The South Freeport Congregational Church where she was a long time choir member she had a voice like an angel , organist and junior choir director. A member of the Harraseeket Yacht Club, Dee was also politically active in town and county politics and was an accomplished piano player who even taught lessons for a few years. Later in , she transferred to Maine Medical Center where, in addition to her duties in the psychiatric unit, she did consultations in the ER and burn units. Dee's experiences made her a firm advocate of family participation. She once said, 'I'm a great believer in family involvement.

    People don't live in a vacuum, they live in a system with others. Mental illness represents great challenges, but with understanding comes acceptance. After her retirement in , she turned her attention and efforts to her family and friends, keeping up a long-standing Gould family tradition called 'Augustfest,' a family reunion held in their home for the past 30 years or so. Augustfest was an event which Dee planned and executed in her typical way-with tons of love and even more important perhaps, her 'meticulous' lists of everything from guests to menus to sleeping arrangements.

    No matter whether 10 people attended or , Dee was ready for anything. Dee is survived by her husband of 62 years, Charles S. Gould; her children, Charles M. Gould of Portland, Barbara L. Gould of Lincolnville, Matthew R. Gould of Falmouth, Mass. Gould of Natick, Mass. In lieu of flowers, contributions can be made to hospice or another charity of your choice Marilyn 'Dee' Gould.

    She lived a deliberately peaceful, quiet and love-filled life; one that she said began when she met her husband, John. Lewiston-Albert P. Monty, 61, of Main St. Lewiston passed away unexpectedly Sunday, December 14, at St. Gordon, on September 7, , in Dixfield. Most of her life was dedicated to her family, and she also worked for many years at Lost Valley Ski Area in the Rental Shop. Prior to that she served as a Sunday School teacher and assisted for several years in the neighborhood mother's club. A member of the Community Little Theater, she appeared in the chorus of many musicals and had small roles in several other productions.

    She was a charter member of the Mollyockett Chapter of Sweet Adelines. Stephanie and Hannah were also special to her. A memorial service will begin at 12 noon in the sanctuary followed by a reception in the Trafton Room. Marilyn enjoyed puzzles, computer games, plastic canvas, spending time with her grandchildren, and was a wonderful homemaker.

    She is survived by her beloved husband Lew; children Dennis, Jeff, Marshall and their wives; brother Stewart; several grandchildren and great grandchildren. Donald Cougle will be officiating. Burial will be held at a later date. Arrangements are under the care of Funeral Alternatives Group, Lewiston. Lewiston-Pauline L. She enjoyed writing poems and reading reciting them to anyone that would listen. She also enjoyed singing to young children. Auburn, Me Burial will follow after the service at Gracelawn Memorial Park.

    Lewiston-Valore F. Yarmouth-Harlene J. Erskine, 70, of West Elm St. Her parents predeceased her. Yarmouth, Me Sidney-Donald W. Drake, 83, of Cameron Dr. He enjoyed old movies, listening and playing bluegrass. He also loved spending time with his family. Vernon Rd. Sidney, Me Augusta, Me Lisbon-Wayne P.

    Hobart, 50, of Village St. Wayne enjoyed swimming, fishing and mowing the lawn. He worked for many years in the auto industry as a salesman, starting at Jolly Johns and most recently with Quirks Auto in Westbrook. Navy during World War II. He received his B. In he married Gloria Sileo in Brooklyn, N. He was an architectural sales representative for Otis Elevator for many years.

    He also served a term on the local school board. When he relocated to Brunswick in , he resumed his community activity by serving first on the Brunswick Conservation Board and then on the Planning Board. He was also active at the 55 Plus Center, now People Plus. He was an avid birdwatcher and hobby printer on a turn-of-the-century letterpress. Funeral services are by Funeral Alternatives in Yarmouth. The family will hold a memorial service, date to be announced. Yarmouth-Clayton Boylston Barter passed away on November 25, Clayton was born on November 13, to Fred N.

    Barter and Myrtis M. Libby, the third of four sons. Clayton started school at age four and attended one room schools until beginning high school at North Yarmouth Academy. He walked to and from high school every day unless he managed to hitch a ride. He dropped out after completing his second year to get a job to help his family, as was common during the depression.

    He prided himself on being a strong and able worker. He was a lifelong Democrat and always urged his family to vote. Community service was very important to him. He ran Beano one Saturday each month to raise funds for the fire and rescue. He at one time served on the planning board and budget committee for the Town of North Yarmouth. He has been a mechanic, a truck driver, carpenter, road commissioner and was sexton of the Walnut Hill Cemetery for more than thirty years. He had many good friends over the years who would stop in for a game of cribbage or to pitch a quick game of horseshoes.

    Until May of this year, he and his friends still got together weekly for card night. He is also survived by his stepson Woody Brown of Windsor, Illinois, stepdaughter Penny Megquier of Gray, daughter Polly Grindle of North Yarmouth, son Fred Barter of North Yarmouth, along with their spouses and partners, and several grandchildren, great grandchildren and some who were like grandchildren. He was predeceased by his youngest daughter Becky Grass of North Yarmouth in and his grandson Sam Megquier in He was the Patriarch of the family, all of us called him Pa, some called him Par.

    He was always there instantly when any of us needed anything. We all miss you and will love you forever Pa. Rivers, 82, of Porter Street, Augusta, died unexpectedly on Nov. She was born in Hermon on Oct. Rivers and his wife, Lisa, of Augusta; a brother, Roger Cronk, of Milford; a sister, Paulette Ugro, of Milford; five grandchildren and several nieces and nephews.

    A memorial service will take place at 10 a. West Gardiner - Alfred Smith, 77, o.

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    West Gardiner passed away at his home on the Benson Road on November 26th , surrounded by his family. He was born March 3, in Monroe, ME. One of 13 children born to Clyde and Evelyn Johnson Smith. He was 7 years old when he went to live with his grandparents Byron and Clara Johnson on their dairy farm. He traveled around the world twice on the destroyer U. John W. Weeks DD and other military ships. After leaving the Navy, Al owned and operated a restaurant and garage on Islesboro. After retirement, Al enjoyed working on anything mechanical, especially old Simplicity tractors, and was often called upon to repair lawn mowers in the neighborhood.

    Al took pride in maintaining his trout pond and feeding the birds. He left knowing his love of camp will be carried on by these special people. He always had a story to tell entertaining both young and old. His brothers Lawrence and wife Janie, Byron and wife Pat. As well as many brothers and sisters in law.

    The family wishes to thank the staff at Togus Veterans Hospital, Beacon Hospice, and the many friends and family for their love, support, thoughts, and prayers. A gathering in celebration of his life will be held on Sunday, December 7th, from to at his home on Benson Rd, West Gardiner. Gardner, 75, of Farmington, N. He was born in to the Rev. Uel A. Air Force during the Korean Conflict.

    An avid outdoorsman and skier, he began a ski industry career at Cannon Mountain N. In the late 50s, he moved to Bethel and helped build Sunday River Skiway. Throughout the early s, he owned and operated several ski schools throughout Maine and New Hampshire and worked his way into ski area management. In the s, he moved his family to the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia, where his expertise in snowmaking was instrumental in building and developing three ski areas.