Download e-book Inside Out (Ben Treven Book 2)

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online Inside Out (Ben Treven Book 2) file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with Inside Out (Ben Treven Book 2) book. Happy reading Inside Out (Ben Treven Book 2) Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF Inside Out (Ben Treven Book 2) at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF Inside Out (Ben Treven Book 2) Pocket Guide.

The man who tried to have him killed in the last book is back but this time to ask for his help. Another agent, thought to be dead, has tapes that document the US governments use of torture during the War on Terror and is holding them for ransom. It is Ben's job to try and get the tapes before they can be released to the public as other agencies try to get their hands on the tapes as well. The plot is complex, the action is non stop and it is relevant to what is going on in the world today.

Scary, but true. What is needed to keep the American public safe? Do we need to know the truth about what the government is doing or should we just be happy in the fact that we are "safe"? All questions that come up in the book and fuel an interesting ending. I enjoyed the book, just not as much as Fault Line. I think what I enjoyed most about that one was the sibling interactions and that was definitely missing from this book with Alex barely getting mentioned.

I am hoping that he will make another appearance in later stories. He is my favorite of the two brothers. Inside Out did get me thinking, though, and definitely kept me entertained. It has also got me excited to see what happens in the next book if two of Eisler's characters come together. Treven and Rain. That will make for quite an exciting read.

I liked the pace of this book as well as the characters. The author gets a bit preachy toward the end of the book and spends a few pages on politics, but overall I really enjoyed the story. I appreciate that Eisler does not beat around the bush when it comes to the use of torture to extract information. I found myself thinking about the circumstances that would bring one human being to subject another to some of the torture methods described in the book. Contemplating that can be disturbing.

Flows right along from Fault Line. Almost too close for comfort in the possibilities, just as Eisler admits in the dialogue-with-the-author at the end of the audio version. Yes, it's a thriller novel first and foremost but beyond that is the close tie to the political reality of the past decade.

Sometimes truth IS just like fiction. Eisler does the reading and is just terrifiche definitely knows what he writes and how he wants it to sound to the listener! Not nearly as good as Eisler's books about John Rain. I couldn't sympathize with any of the characters and wound up skimming the last half of the book to see where it ended. This is a great political thriller.

- Spy Guys And Gals

I like it a lot. However, like other reviewers suggested, its ending is not very satisfying. This book is my 2nd Eisler novel, I will definitely read more of his work. Eisler has cemented himself as one of my favorite modern thriller writers. More importantly, he has, I believe, established that he is simply one of the best thriller writers in the business. He creates three-dimensional characters with strengths and weaknesses and real motivations and concerns; he creates characters that the reader cares about, something all too-often lacking in thrillers. Eisler is also one of those writers who is able to give readers a true sense of place; you feel very much as if you are in the places his characters experience and describe.

In addition, when Eisler has a character talk about or participate in combat or espionage-related activities, he is able to impart to the reader a real sense that what Eisler is telling you is, in fact, either true or largely accurate; in other words, when it comes to things like combat and tactics, you don't feel as if Eisler is making it up as he goes. Given his experience as a CIA operative, that isn't too surprising.

And for fans of the John Rain novels, Eisler makes it very clear adding on to the hints in Fault Line that Treven inhabits the same universe as John Rain. The plot of the novel in some ways reminded me of some of the best novels from Robert Ludlum's heydey, when the protagonist isn't always quite sure which side he is on or who, exactly, is the opposition. More importantly, without getting into spoilers or giving anything away, good and evil, at least in the organizational, rather than indiviudual, sense, is a bit more gray and less black and white.

At its core, though, Inside Out is a book that takes today's headlines and wraps a fictional or is it? Eisler even goes to the trouble of providing lists of sources and a bibliography at the conclusion of his novel. Treven chases after the notorious missing destroyed? CIA torture tapes. In so doing he begins to learn about and question much of what he has been told and much of what he has previously thought. In Fault Line Treven began to learn that things were not always what they seem and his shift in viewpoint began. Inside Out continues that evolution of character. If I had to register a complaint, it would be that Treven seems a bit quick to make some of leaps of understanding, but that is a minor criticism.

One other thing to make note of spoiler alert : Eisler makes the interesting choice of making both a primary antogonist and a secondary antagonist minorities. Were Eisler a different writer, this might have come off as motivated by prejudice. But Eisler is able to handle this decision with skill and, more importantly, gives a reason for having done so. That he can make his 'bad guys' minorities without making minorities the bad guys is a true literary feat for which he should be commended.

Some may not like the politics of Eisler's book. However, I'd suggest that fans of Vince Flynn or Brad Thor give Eisler a try and compare some of the views that he expresses with those pontificated at unfortunate length by Flynn and Thor. And after reading Inside Out , take some time to really think about the news stories that form the basis for the plot and think about Eisler's suggestions and undestandings of the political system and the implications of some of the things he describes was that cryptic enough?

Anyway, stop reading this and go get a copy of Inside Out or at least pre-order a copy And then put Eisler on your must read list. I agree with some of the reviews on the back on the book is this real or fiction?!? It seems pretty close to being real and that's a wee bit scary!!!! Ben Treven is tasked with finding an ex-soldier who is blackmailing the government with previously unknown torture videotapes. I love the character of Ben Treven and can't wait to read more of him in the future books.

He's definitely flawed and I like that he knows that about himself. In fact, there seems to be a teaser that Ben and John and Dox will meet up in future books. Color me excited if that were to happen. I enjoyed this book at the start. The story also meandered and didn't hold my attention as well as it should have. Finally, the conclusion was unsatisfactory. I could see that there was a good deal of research about these tapes but after reading the author's excellent John Rain novels, this story disappointed.

Note: I did think it was fun that Ben's superior is named Scott Horton and Scott Horton is the name of one of the people who wrote a blurb on the novel's back cover. This Scott Horton is a contributing editor of "Harpers. View all 3 comments. Jun 26, Jill Dunlop rated it liked it.

Ben Treven is a black ops soldier who recent had everything he believes in turned upside down in the previous novel Fault Line. This time Ben has been asked to track down a rogue operator who is threatening the US government with revealing tapes of American soldiers torturing prisoners all in the name of war. While Inside Out had many of the things I enjoyed about Fault Line, the first Ben Treven novel, it also didn't quite live up to my expectations.

I think Inside Out was much more focused on the external conflict Ben was facing in hunting down Larison and was much less focused on Ben's relationships with those around him.


  • Silver Sword Saga.
  • Ben Treven;
  • The Heart of the Matter: Maybe Ben Treven Was On To Something.
  • A Way of Hope: Seven Steps Toward Breaking the Cycle of Violence!
  • A Dropped Stitches Wedding (Mills & Boon Love Inspired) (Steeple Hill Café, Book 11).

Inside Out also seemed transitional in the fact that Ben is being groomed to take on more a leadership role and active participant in his division than just being a mindless drone that just takes orders and executes them. There is no doubt that Barry Eisler writes a compelling, well researched and believable story.

He is extremely knowledgeable in the nuances of the United States government and how it would manage a crisis it didn't want the American public getting wind of. It actually makes a person wonder at just what kinds of things are being kept hidden from us. Barry also can write compelling characters and gives the reader insight into how a soldier, especially a fierce, loyal and aggressive soldier views the world. I found it very interesting how Paula would psychoanalyze Ben and hit the nail right on the head.

I do wish that there would have been more romance between these two, although the one sex scene in the book was smoking hot! Also, I felt like certain issues were wrapped up rather quickly at the end. But, I am definitely going to be reading the next Ben Treven novel. View all 4 comments. Aug 11, Jocelyn No rated it liked it Shelves: cia , assassins , contemporary-setting , costa-rica , washington-dc. Loved the book, didn't think much of the protagonist, though.

I enjoyed the read, but probably won't read it again. Stuff I liked: the shadowy government manipulations were great - so accurate and so depressing. There was this picture of Obama when he walked out of the FBI building, after he was elected and before he became President, and in the caption it said that he'd been briefed on Presidential-legal confidential information.


  1. Navigation menu.
  2. THE RUSSIAN VODKA SYNDROME;
  3. Inside Out (Audiobook) by Barry Eisler | yxicavicox.ml;
  4. Order of Ben Treven Books.
  5. Barry Eisler;
  6. Why Not Today: Trafficking, Slavery, the Global Church . . . and You!
  7. His facial expression in that photo was amazing - he looked like h Loved the book, didn't think much of the protagonist, though. His facial expression in that photo was amazing - he looked like he'd aged 10 years in the one day he spent in that building. Just shell-shocked. My mind kept going back to that photograph as I read this book. I loved the love interest.

    I hope we see more of her as this series progresses. Overall, I don't think these books are as good as the John Rain books, mostly because I don't think the main character is as thoughtful or relatable. But he seemed to evolve a lot over the course of this book, and I've got high hopes for future installments. Apr 15, Pamela rated it really liked it. An operative is rescued from a Manila jail after an angry rampage and sent to locate a former operative who holds 92 tapes of torturing done at secret prisons for terrorists, etc.

    His inside knowledge of operatives is apparent, and his pragmatic view of political interworkings rings too true for comfort. Aug 14, Skip rated it liked it Shelves: thriller. Ben Treven is tossed into a hellhole jail for a barfight in which he killed an Aussie sailor. Rescued by his commander, Hort, he is asked to help neutralize a former colleague, who is blackmailing the U. After trashing her two colleagues, Ben decides to join forces with a black female FBI agent to trap the target.

    Decent, but not on a par with the John Rain series. View all 6 comments. Sep 22, Justin rated it really liked it. One that follows the real life story in the wake of when the U.

    Inside Out: Ben Treven, Book 2 (Unabridged)

    I enjoyed everything about this book, other than it being part of a series and felt.. But fast paced, intelligent, poignant and violent, this thriller delivers the goods, just the finale needs work. Do you remember the 'missing' CIA torture tapes? Well, have a look at the appendix to 'Inside Out' and you will find a documentary chronology of the news reports about that incident. In this, the second in the new Ben Traven series of novels, Barry Eisler uses the missing torture tapes as a first step in an examination of media spin, the oligarchy, and torture.

    By now, many of us have become skeptical about anything the US government has to say about its behavior, and with good reason. The 's Do you remember the 'missing' CIA torture tapes? Bush looking here, looking there, looking everywhere while hundreds of thousands of Iraqis died. The NSA surveillance of US citizens on US soil - the initial denials, the eventual partial admissions, and the use of 'state secrets' to prevent any redress.

    The Killer Collective by Barry Eisler

    All these and more tell us, as if we didn't know before, that when the US government speaks to its people we can expect only lies and propaganda. So one of the themes of 'Inside Out' is the masterful way in which the US government manages the media. Missing torture tapes? Tell the media on a Friday evening that the CIA has 'discovered' that there are 2 tapes missing from the archives.

    Say nothing more until the mild ensuing controversy has died down and the media has managed to focus attention away from torture and onto the latest about Lindsey Lohan. Then announce that 'further investigation' has 'revealed' that it was actually 92 tapes missing, not just 2. Oops, our bad.

    By the time the second announcement is made, any questions about the significance of missing tapes have already been asked and ignored, and the risk of actual accountability is slight. Another thread running through the novel is the oligarchy: the 'power elite' who sit at the top of the political and economic food chain. The loose confederation of corporate executives, wealthy stockholders, and high government officials who operate largely above the law with little or no accountability for their actions.

    Those for whom we are instructed to 'look forward, not backward' when they are found to have committed egregious crimes. Mainly, though, this is a thriller. Near super-hero good guy engaged in a fight to the death with a worthy opponent, both of them pawns in a larger game. And it works well as a thriller, with enough plot twists to prevent it being predictable, and enough interesting characters to keep the reader engaged.

    It is also a much better written novel than its predecessor, 'Fault Lines'. The political themes are present but don't interfere with the plot - in fact, the politics actually advances the plot, especially the Dick Cheney-like character. Jul 12, Gail Cooke rated it it was amazing. He's never failed me yet - Barry Eisler's books have been consistently exciting, gripping, can't-put-down thrillers, especially the John Rain titles.

    While it is a brilliant fictional account, don't think for a minute that it's fiction After a deadly barroom brawl black ops soldier Ben Treven remembered from FAULT LINE is tossed into a nightmarish Manilla prison where he fears he'll never be given a hearing but left to rot in the cell he shares with a dozen other prisoners. Why is Hort there? In his words, "When I heard they had visiting hours in hell, I just couldn't stay away. These tapes are incendiary showing torture approved by the office of the U.

    Vice President. Ben is to find and get rid of Larison. At some level Ben seems to realize that he is being manipulated and threatened, but could not resist Hort's approval nor deny his desperate need to get out of prison. Little did he know or even dare imagine the twists and turns, machinations and betrayals that he would face. The FBI is represented by Paula Lanier, a beauteous agent, which gives Eisler the opportunity to pen one hot sex scene. Nonetheless pleasure aside,, Ben finds himself unable to distinguish between friend and enemy, always guarding his back, and realizing that there is even more to the tapes than their explosive content.

    After his three years in the CIA it is a story only Eisler could have and should have written. Forged with tension, terror, and truth it should be required reading. Exhaustively researched the book includes a Bibliography and an impressive list of Sources. Dec 02, Russell Brooks rated it really liked it. Conspiracy-theory buffs are in for a treat. Treven—who was imprisoned after a bar fight he was in resulted in the death of one of his attackers—is released from jail with the aid of his former commander, Colon Conspiracy-theory buffs are in for a treat.

    Treven—who was imprisoned after a bar fight he was in resulted in the death of one of his attackers—is released from jail with the aid of his former commander, Colonel Scott Horton. Along the way, he is joined by Paula Lanier—a sexy FBI agent with an attitude—who is not only an annoyance to Treven, but later becomes an ally. What complicates matters further for Treven is that other hit squads have been dispatched to hunt for Larison, leaving Treven to suspect that he may be a pawn in a bigger picture. Inside Out contains some well-paced action, martial arts, and a believable conspiracy that will leave the reader wondering if all of it is really fiction.

    This is illustrated by her naivety in handling certain situations that risk exposing them. At times, I had a chuckle picturing how pissed off Treven must have been every time she made a gaff. What I also enjoyed was that Eisler allowed readers to enter into the minds of both Treven and his target, Larison, illustrating his first-hand knowledge of surveillance and reconnaissance techniques. The fight scenes were very believable, and the hand-on-hand combat scenes were meticulously well done. Jul 06, mari rated it really liked it Shelves: fiction , thriller.

    Publication Order of Ben Treven Novels

    My husband and his family have known about Eisler for awhile since he lives in the same town as them and have also read all the his John Rain books. Inside Out begins not too long after the end of the events in Fault Line. Ben Treven is a bit down and out and has found himself in a Manilla jail.

    The man who tried to have him killed in the last book is back but this time to ask for his help. Another agent, thought to be dead, has tapes that document the US governments use of torture during the War on Terror and is holding them for ransom. It is Ben's job to try and get the tapes before they can be released to the public as other agencies try to get their hands on the tapes as well. The plot is complex, the action is non stop and it is relevant to what is going on in the world today.

    Scary, but true. What is needed to keep the American public safe? Do we need to know the truth about what the government is doing or should we just be happy in the fact that we are "safe"? All questions that come up in the book and fuel an interesting ending. I enjoyed the book, just not as much as Fault Line. I think what I enjoyed most about that one was the sibling interactions and that was definitely missing from this book with Alex barely getting mentioned. I am hoping that he will make another appearance in later stories.

    He is my favorite of the two brothers. Inside Out did get me thinking, though, and definitely kept me entertained. It has also got me excited to see what happens in the next book if two of Eisler's characters come together. Treven and Rain. That will make for quite an exciting read. Aug 10, Joe rated it really liked it. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Although still not as good as the original Rain series, Eisler puts forward another quality story continuing to build around his new protagonist, Ben Treven and the world that he inhabits.

    This meticulously researched work puts you on the ground in the world of black ops and a soldier slowly beginning to question the status quo, as well as his life's work. This latest adventure provides Treven with what may be an unwanted sneak peak into the higher level machinations that fuel modern day politic Although still not as good as the original Rain series, Eisler puts forward another quality story continuing to build around his new protagonist, Ben Treven and the world that he inhabits.

    This latest adventure provides Treven with what may be an unwanted sneak peak into the higher level machinations that fuel modern day politics and leaves him trying to make sense of his reality. Through the original Rain series, Eisler puts you in the shoes of a veteran assassin and uses character development to drive the story to provide a glimpse into a darker world of covert operations.

    Conversely, by switching the story from first person to third, the Treven novels focus less on character development and begin to further build out the world in which the likes of Treven and Rain operate. Salvation appears in Stella - a woman as damaged, and resourceful, as he. But when a coded distress call from his former CO leads him to a shadowy NSA operative, Tom is recruited for a "black op" to bring back the now-rogue man who saved his life.

    Evan Smoak is a man with skills, resources, and a personal mission to help those with nowhere else to turn. He's also a man with a dangerous past. Chosen as a child, he was raised and trained as part of the off-the-books black box Orphan program, designed to create the perfect deniable intelligence assets - i. He was Orphan X. Evan broke with the program, using everything he learned to disappear. In the future, two scientists are accompanied by a team of Navy SEALs to position critical tectonic equipment on a deserted island in the Galapagos and find themselves immersed in a brutal war for survival that could determine the fate of the world.

    No names. No Feds. No trace evidence. That's how Jonathan Grave operates. As a freelance specialist in covert rescues, he has to work outside the law to get things done - especially in highly sensitive hostage situations. But when an Indiana college student is abducted, and Jonathan's meticulous plan explodes into a deadly shooting spree, the local authorities are out for blood - and they're not alone. Someone wants to control a devastating secret Someone rich and powerful. Hired by an influential US senator to liberate his daughter from a human-trafficking ring, Decker never anticipated sabotage or that the assault could go so disastrously wrong.

    The hostage is dead. As a therapist specializing in sexual issues, psychiatrist Dr. Morgan Snow isn't easily shocked, or shaken, as readers of the popular "Butterfield Institute" novels know. There are times, however, when the need for her services leads her out of the office In these stories, the therapist matches her wits -and her training - against three men of mystery: Jack Reacher, John Rain, and Cotton Malone. Riske is a freelance industrial spy who, despite his job title, lives a mostly quiet life above his auto garage in central London.

    He has avoided big, messy jobs - until now. A gangster by the name of Tino Coluzzi - once a compatriot of Riske - has orchestrated the greatest street heist in the history of Paris: a visiting Saudi prince had his pockets lightened of millions in cash, and something else. Hidden within a stolen briefcase is a secret letter that could upend the balance of power in the Western world. The Russians have already killed in an attempt to get it back. Ghost Detainees. And a massive cover-up that continues even today.

    Marooned in a Manila jail after a bar fight fatality, black ops soldier Ben Treven gets a visit from his former commander, Colonel Scott Horton, who explains the price of Ben's release: find and eliminate Daniel Larison, a rogue operator from Ben's unit who has stolen 92 torture tapes from the CIA and is using them to blackmail the U. But other players are after the tapes, too, and to find Larison, Ben will have to survive CIA hit teams, Blackwater mercenaries, and the long reach of the White House.

    Inside Out

    He'll also have to find a way to handle Paula Lanier, a smart, sexy FBI agent who has her own reasons for wanting the tapes and is determined to get them before Ben does. With the stakes this high, everyone has an angle - everyone but Ben, who will have to find the right alliance if he wants to stay alive. I've blown through most of Eisler's books now. But this newer series- and I hate to say it- feels formulaic in one sense. Haven't even gotten to the actual sex yet, but it's obvious it's where this one is going.

    I really admire a lot about Eisler's books. He articulates many differ dimensional levels not only to the characters, and their back stories, but also to political landscapes and realities. But this part- and I actually think he writes to erotic scenes very well, too- it's the way these women seem to cave, I guess- seems too predictable, and sad. And disrespectful. That's not a pc complaint, it's an intellectual honesty complaint. Anyway, it bugged me enough this time to wonder aloud if I'm alone on this. Who was your favorite character and why? Ben Treven is my favorite, but Hort runs a close second.

    He is so deviousl, you never know when he's being honest or plotting out some scheme. Great character. I also like how Ben constantly looks for Hort's praise even knowing what kind of person he is, almost as a father figure. Any additional comments?

    Chronological Order of Ben Treven Books

    It is important to listen to them in order as each one builds on the previous. I also really like Barry Eisler as a narrator. He does an excellent job. Great second installment of the new series. I particularly enjoyed the details describing DC, it made me feel like I was back there again. Hort's oligarchy discussion is very important, and everyone should read it.