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The Trustworthy Leader: Leveraging the Power of Trust to Transform Your Organization

Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. How leaders from the best workplaces build trust in their organizations The Trustworthy Leader reveals the benefits organizations enjoy when trustworthy behavior is practiced consistently by their leaders.

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Drawing from examples from the Best Companies to Work For, Lyman, cofounder of Great Place to Work Institute, explains that being trustworthy means that leaders' behavio How leaders from the best workplaces build trust in their organizations The Trustworthy Leader reveals the benefits organizations enjoy when trustworthy behavior is practiced consistently by their leaders. Drawing from examples from the Best Companies to Work For, Lyman, cofounder of Great Place to Work Institute, explains that being trustworthy means that leaders' behaviors are rooted in their commitment to the value of trust and not simply in an imitation of the practices of others.

Trustworthy Leader: Leveraging the Powe of Trust to Transform Your Organization

She identifies six elements that reflect a leader's trustworthiness: honor, inclusion, engaging followers, sharing information, developing others, and moving through uncertainty to pursue opportunities. Baird, TDIndustries, and more Based on more than 20 years of rigorous research into the value of trust in companies large and small and its link to financial and organizational performance Published to coincide with the release of the FORTUNE Best Companies to Work For list This book offers a key to developing high levels of trust, a critical endeavor in an age when seemingly every day a story of a leader's lapse in ethical behavior makes headlines.

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Published January 3rd by Jossey-Bass first published November 15th More Details Other Editions 6. Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about The Trustworthy Leader , please sign up. Be the first to ask a question about The Trustworthy Leader.

Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Community Reviews. Showing Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Nov 14, Terry rated it really liked it. This a great leadership book!

I am not sure why others have hammered it in their reviews but i really enjoyed its key concepts and i am going to recommend it all new leaders that work for me. View 1 comment. John Knapp rated it it was ok Dec 30, David Willden rated it it was amazing Dec 06, Michael Raible rated it it was amazing Jan 02, Christina Lewis rated it really liked it Apr 01, Sean Harry rated it really liked it May 31, Kelly rated it liked it Feb 08, Drew Clancy rated it really liked it Sep 29, John rated it really liked it Jan 17, Dolores rated it it was ok Apr 11, Amy rated it liked it Jan 03, Santi Villarreal rated it really liked it Jul 27, Am I confident that you are a person who does what you say you are going to do?

And third, trust depends on motive. In our work with senior leadership teams in hundreds of companies across dozens of industries, these three questions have proven remarkably effective in helping individuals have honest and respectful conversations about their levels of trust for one another. And the model works at all levels of the organization, from front line employees to the most senior leaders of a company.

The research is overwhelming and clear. In terms of return on shareholder investment, high-trust organizations outperform companies with low levels of trust. Consider the following studies:.

Trustworthy Leader: Leveraging the Power of Trust to Transform Your Organization

And the benefits extend well beyond shareholder returns. A study by Interaction Associates found that high-trust organizations outperformed low-trust organizations on a number of dimensions: exhibiting organizational behavior consistent with company values and ethics 85 percent vs. One of the most valuable products of organizational trust is often the one that is most underappreciated. That benefit is speed. Over the years, we have noticed a pattern among high performing companies. They make decisions quickly and the decisions they make stick.

Rarely do they engage in endless debate in search of the perfect answer. Nor do they make decisions only to see those decisions unravel through back channel dealing or front-line resistance. Rather, they seem to move effortlessly through their decision making process, producing decisions that are clear and that enjoy the broad support of the organization.

They are not always right, but they are certainly more agile and adaptable than their competitors. And when they are wrong, they are quick to alter course and decide on a new path forward. What lies underneath the ability to be so agile and decisive? In order to understand why trust results in organizational agility and decisiveness, it is important to understand the distinction between agreement and alignment. Agreement describes a state of decision-making where all participants view the ultimate decision as their first choice.

On the other hand, a group is aligned when all participants behave as if the ultimate decision is their first choice even if it may have been their second or third. In practice, an outside observer should be unable to distinguish between a group that emerges from a decision in agreement or in alignment. And if the decision turns out to be wrong, each member of the decision making group will act as if they have shared ownership in the outcome. In high-trust organizations, individuals perceive most decisions as having low personal risk. If you trust the motives, competence, and reliability of your colleagues, you are much more willing to align behind a decision, even if that decision is not your first choice.

In contrast, in low-trust organizations, decisions are rarely made without unanimity of agreement. As Figure 2 illustrates, it is easy to see why high-trust organizations are able to move more quickly. The share of decisions around which they are able to align as opposed to reach agreement is much greater given the high levels of reciprocal trust and the corresponding low levels of perceived risk. Perhaps the most vivid illustration of the way in which trust enables organizations to act with speed in uncertain situations is the storied effectiveness of the Navy SEALs.

In his recent book Team of Teams , General Stanley McChrystal attributes the exceptional capability of SEAL teams not to individual prowess but to the exceptionally high levels of trust that exist between soldiers:. But a team fused by trust and purpose is much more potent. Building trust, like any core competency in a business, is hard work. Organizations that have successfully built high-trust cultures can generally point to the following five things. A company must have a CEO who is truly committed to role modeling, rewarding, and prioritizing trust within her organization.

This requires that the CEO use every available opportunity to demonstrate authenticity and vulnerability. Leaders who are authentic tend to be trusted. And the leader must follow through on the commitments he makes. That means being careful about promising too much and being honest about what can and cannot be delivered. Senior Team. The hallmark of high performing teams is trust. When we work with senior leadership teams, we spend a lot of time facilitating deep one on one and group dialogues where senior leaders are given the space to be vulnerable and to allow their colleagues to learn deeply intimate aspects of their personal and professional aspirations and realities.

Only by knowing each other can members of a senior team begin to trust each other. This trust allows teams to have open, constructive, and courageous dialogues, which lead to high quality decisions with a strong sense of shared ownership and accountability. Just as important, high levels of trust within a senior leadership team is palpable and radiates throughout the organization. Managers and front-line employees almost have no choice but to respond in kind. High-trust organizations almost universally default to being open and transparent. These companies almost always view sharing of information as an important aspect of their culture, and, accordingly, are willing to take measured risk associated with potential over-sharing of information rather than incurring the loss of cultural capital that comes from withholding information.

Companies tend to lean in the direction of one of two management philosophies: a command and control hierarchical approach, on the one hand, or a bias toward empowering employees to take risk and make decisions consistent with a set of clear company goals and objectives. High-trust organizations almost always fall into the latter category. By giving employees latitude to exercise creativity and take measured risk, an organization sends a very strong and clear signal that its employees are trusted to act as responsible stewards of the company.

The case of Netflix illustrates this concept powerfully. Performance-based Culture. Organizational trust can only exist if individuals in the company consistently demonstrate competency and reliability.