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They had raised it two feet. Bars of iron planted in the pavement resembled lances in rest. All sorts of rubbish brought and added from all directions complicated the external confusion. The redoubt had been cleverly made over, into a wall on the inside and a thicket on the outside. The staircase of paving-stones which permitted one to mount it like the wall of a citadel had been reconstructed. Page The barricade had been put in order, the tap-room disencumbered, the kitchen appropriated for the ambulance, the dressing of the wounded completed, the powder scattered on the ground and on the tables had been gathered up, bullets run, cartridges manufactured, lint scraped, the fallen weapons re-distributed, the interior of the redoubt cleaned, the rubbish swept up, corpses removed.

They laid the dead in a heap in the Mondetour lane, of which they were still the masters. The pavement was red for a long time at that spot. Among the dead there were four National Guardsmen of the suburbs. Enjolras had their uniforms laid aside. Enjolras had advised two hours of sleep. Advice from Enjolras was a command. Still, only three or four took advantage of it. These four words, hollowed out in the rough stone with a nail, could be still read on the wall in The three women had profited by the respite of the night to vanish definitely; which allowed the insurgents to breathe more freely.

The greater part of the wounded were able, and wished, to fight still. On a litter of mattresses and trusses of straw in the kitchen, which had been converted into an ambulance, there were five men gravely wounded, two of whom were municipal guardsmen. The municipal guardsmen were attended to first.

In the tap-room there remained only Mabeuf under his black cloth and Javert bound to his post. In the interior of this hall, barely lighted by a candle at Page 11 one end, the mortuary table being behind the post like a horizontal bar, a sort of vast, vague cross resulted from Javert erect and Mabeuf lying prone. The pole of the omnibus, although snapped off by the fusillade, was still sufficiently upright to admit of their fastening the flag to it. Enjolras, who possessed that quality of a leader, of always doing what he said, attached to this staff the bullet-ridden and bloody coat of the old man's.

No repast had been possible. There was neither bread nor meat. The fifty men in the barricade had speedily exhausted the scanty provisions of the wine-shop during the sixteen hours which they had passed there. At a given moment, every barricade inevitably becomes the raft of la Meduse. They were obliged to resign themselves to hunger. They had then reached the first hours of that Spartan day of the 6th of June when, in the barricade Saint-Merry, Jeanne, surrounded by the insurgents who demanded bread, replied to all combatants crying: "Something to eat!

It is three o'clock; at four we shall be dead. As they could no longer eat, Enjolras forbade them to drink. He interdicted wine, and portioned out the brandy. They had found in the cellar fifteen full bottles hermetically sealed. Enjolras and Combeferre examined them. Combeferre when he came up again said: -- "It's the old stock of Father Hucheloup, who began business as a grocer.

If he were on foot, there would be a good deal of difficulty in saving those bottles. About two o'clock in the morning, they reckoned up their strength. There were still thirty-seven of them. The day began to dawn. The torch, which had been replaced in its cavity in the pavement, had just been extinguished. The interior of the barricade, that species of tiny Page 12 courtyard appropriated from the street, was bathed in shadows, and resembled, athwart the vague, twilight horror, the deck of a disabled ship.

The combatants, as they went and came, moved about there like black forms. Above that terrible nesting-place of gloom the stories of the mute houses were lividly outlined; at the very top, the chimneys stood palely out. The sky was of that charming, undecided hue, which may be white and may be blue. Birds flew about in it with cries of joy. The lofty house which formed the back of the barricade, being turned to the East, had upon its roof a rosy reflection. The morning breeze ruffled the gray hair on the head of the dead man at the third-story window.

It had the appearance of being afraid. The light of torches resembles the wisdom of cowards; it gives a bad light because it trembles. The good God, having made the mouse, said: 'Hullo! I have committed a blunder. The cat is the erratum of the mouse. The mouse, plus the cat, is the proof of creation revised and corrected. Combeferre, surrounded by students and artisans, was speaking of the dead, of Jean Prouvaire, of Bahorel, of Mabeuf, and even of Cabuc, and of Enjolras' sad severity.

He said: Our hearts quiver so, and human life is such a mystery that, even in the case of a civic murder, even in a murder for liberation, if there be such a thing, the remorse for having struck a man surpasses the joy of having served the human race. And, such are the windings of the exchange of speech, that, a moment later, by a transition brought about through Jean Prouvaire's verses, Combeferre was comparing the translators of the Georgics, Raux with Cournand, Cournand with Delille, pointing out the passages translated by Malfilatre, particularly the prodigies of Caesar's death; and at that word, Caesar, the conversation reverted to Brutus.

Cicero was severe towards Caesar, and he was right. That severity is not diatribe. When Zoilus insults Homer, when Maevius insults Virgil, when Vise insults Moliere, when Pope insults Shakspeare, when Frederic insults Voltaire, it is an old law of envy and hatred which is being carried out; genius attracts insult, great men are always more or less barked at.

But Zoilus and Cicero are two different persons. Cicero is an arbiter in thought, just as Brutus is an arbiter by the sword. For my own part, I blame that last justice, the blade; but, antiquity admitted it. Caesar, the violator of the Rubicon, conferring, as though they came from him, the dignities which emanated from the people, not rising at the entrance of the senate, committed the acts of a king and almost of a tyrant, regia ac pene tyrannica.

He was a great man; so much the worse, or so much the better; the lesson is but the more exalted. His twenty-three wounds touch me less than the spitting in the face of Jesus Christ. Caesar is stabbed by the senators; Christ is cuffed by lackeys. One feels the God through the greater outrage. Bossuet, who towered above the interlocutors from the summit of a heap of paving-stones, exclaimed, rifle in hand: Who will grant me to pronounce the verses of Homer like a Greek of Laurium or of Edapteon? He had made his way out through Mondetour lane, gliding along close to the houses.

The insurgents, we will remark, were full of hope. The manner in which they had repulsed the attack of the preceding night had caused them to almost disdain in advance the attack at dawn. They waited for it with a smile. They had no more doubt as to their success than as to their cause. Moreover, succor was, evidently, on the way to them. They reckoned on it. With that facility of triumphant prophecy which is one of the sources of strength in the French combatant, they divided the day which was at hand into three distinct phases.

At six o'clock in the morning a regiment "which had been labored with," would turn; at noon, the insurrection of all Paris; at sunset, revolution. They heard the alarm bell of Saint-Merry, which had not been silent for an instant since the night before; a proof that the other barricade, the great one, Jeanne's, still held out. All these hopes were exchanged between the different groups in a sort of gay and formidable whisper which resembled the warlike hum of a hive of bees. Enjolras reappeared. He returned from his sombre eagle flight into outer darkness.

He listened for a moment to all this joy with folded arms, and one hand on his mouth. Then, fresh and rosy in the growing whiteness of the dawn, he said:. A third of the army is bearing down upon the barricades in which you now are. There is the National Guard in addition. I have picked out the shakos of the fifth of the line, and the standard-bearers of the sixth legion. In one hour you will be attacked. As for the populace, it was seething yesterday, to-day it is not stirring. Page 15 There is nothing to expect; nothing to hope for. Neither from a faubourg nor from a regiment.

You are abandoned. These words fell upon the buzzing of the groups, and produced on them the effect caused on a swarm of bees by the first drops of a storm.

Les Miserables, Volume V, Jean Valjean

A moment of indescribable silence ensued, in which death might have been heard flitting by. Let us raise the barricade to a height of twenty feet, and let us all remain in it. Citizens, let us offer the protests of corpses. Let us show that, if the people abandon the republicans, the republicans do not abandon the people.

These words freed the thought of all from the painful cloud of individual anxieties. It was hailed with an enthusiastic acclamation. No one ever has known the name of the man who spoke thus; he was some unknown blouse-wearer, a stranger, a man forgotten, a passing hero, that great anonymous, always mingled in human crises and in social geneses who, at a given moment, utters in a supreme fashion the decisive word, and who vanishes into the shadows after having represented for a minute, in a lightning flash, the people and God.

This inexorable resolution so thoroughly impregnated the air of the 6th of June, , that, almost at the very same hour, on the barricade Saint-Merry, the insurgents were raising that clamor which has become a matter of history and which has been consigned to the documents in the case: -- "What matters it whether they come to our assistance or not? Let us get ourselves killed here, to the very last man. As the reader sees, the two barricades, though materially isolated, were in communication with each other. AFTER the man who decreed the "protest of corpses" had spoken, and had given this formula of their common soul, there issued from all mouths a strangely satisfied and terrible cry, funereal in sense and triumphant in tone:.

Thirty men are enough. Why sacrifice forty? Vain-glory is waste. If the duty of some is to depart, that duty should be fulfilled like any other. Enjolras, the man-principle, had over his co-religionists that sort of omnipotent power which emanates from the absolute. Still, great as was this omnipotence, a murmur arose.

A leader to the very finger-tips, Enjolras, seeing that they murmured, insisted. He resumed haughtily:. The barricade is hemmed in. You would fall in with some grand guard of the line Page 17 or the suburbs; they will spy a man passing in blouse and cap. You smell of powder. Enjolras, without making any reply, touched Combeferre's shoulder, and the two entered the tap-room.

They emerged thence a moment later. Enjolras held in his outstretched hands the four uniforms which he had laid aside. Combeferre followed, carrying the shoulder-belts and the shakos. Do you know what the question is here? It is a question of women. See here. Are there women or are there not? Are there children or are there not? Are there mothers, yes or no, who rock cradles with their foot and who have a lot of little ones around them? Let that man of you who has never beheld a nurse's breast raise his hand. Die, if you will, but don't make others die.

Suicides like that which is on the brink of accomplishment here are sublime; but suicide is narrow, and does not admit of extension; and as soon as it touches your neighbors, suicide is murder. Think of the little blond heads; think of the white locks. Listen, Enjolras has just told me that he saw at the corner of the Rue du Cygne a lighted casement, a candle in a poor window, on the fifth floor, and on the pane the quivering shadow of the head of an old woman, who had the air of having spent the night in watching. Perhaps she is the mother of some one of you.

Well, let that man go, and make haste, to say to his mother: 'Here I am, mother! When one supports one's relatives by one's toil, one has not the right to sacrifice one's self. That is deserting one's family. And those who have daughters! You get yourselves killed, you are dead, that is well. And to- morrow? Young girls without bread -- that is a terrible thing. Man begs, woman sells. What do you want me to say to you? There is a market for human flesh; and it is not with your shadowy hands, shuddering around them, that you will prevent them from entering it!

Think of the street, think of the pavement covered with passersby, think of the shops past which women go and come with necks all bare, and through the mire. These women, too, were pure once.

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Think of your sisters, those of you who have them. Misery, prostitution, the police, Saint-Lazare -- that is what those beautiful, delicate girls, those fragile marvels of modesty, gentleness and loveliness, fresher than lilacs in the month of May, will come to. You are no longer on hand! That is well; you have wished to release the people from Royalty, and you deliver over your daughters to the police. Friends, have a care, have mercy. Women, unhappy women, we are not in the habit of bestowing much thought on them.

We trust to the women not having received a man's education, we prevent their reading, we prevent their thinking, we prevent their occupying themselves with politics; will you prevent them from going to the dead- house this evening, and recognizing your bodies? Let us see, those who have families must be tractable, and shake hands with us and take themselves off, and leave us here alone to attend to this affair. I know well that courage Page 19 is required to leave, that it is hard; but the harder it is, the more meritorious. You say: 'I have a gun, I am at the barricade; so much the worse, I shall remain there.

My friends, there is a morrow; you will not be here to-morrow, but your families will; and what sufferings! See, here is a pretty, healthy child, with cheeks like an apple, who babbles, prattles, chatters, who laughs, who smells sweet beneath your kiss, -- and do you know what becomes of him when he is abandoned? I have seen one, a very small creature, no taller than that.

His father was dead. Poor people had taken him in out of charity, but they had bread only for themselves. The child was always hungry. It was winter. He did not cry. You could see him approach the stove, in which there was never any fire, and whose pipe, you know, was of mastic and yellow clay. His breathing was hoarse, his face livid, his limbs flaccid, his belly prominent. He said nothing. If you spoke to him, he did not answer. He is dead. He was taken to the Necker Hospital, where I saw him. I was house-surgeon in that hospital. Now, if there are any fathers among you, fathers whose happiness it is to stroll on Sundays holding their child's tiny hand in their robust hand, let each one of those fathers imagine that this child is his own.

That poor brat, I remember, and I seem to see him now, when he lay nude on the dissecting table, how his ribs stood out on his skin like the graves beneath the grass in a cemetery. A sort of mud was found in his stomach. There were ashes in his teeth. Come, let us examine ourselves conscientiously and take counsel with our heart. Statistics show that the mortality among abandoned children is fifty- five per cent.

I repeat, it is a question of women, it concerns mothers, it concerns young girls, it concerns little children. Who is talking to you of yourselves? We know well what you are; we know well that you are all brave, parbleu! Very well. But you are not alone in this world. There are other beings of whom you must think. You must not be egoists. Strange contradictions of the human heart at its most sublime moments. Combeferre, who spoke thus, was not an orphan. He recalled the mothers of other men, and forgot his own.

He was about to get himself killed. He was "an egoist. Marius, fasting, fevered, having emerged in succession from all hope, and having been stranded in grief, the most sombre of shipwrecks, and saturated with violent emotions and conscious that the end was near, had plunged deeper and deeper into that visionary stupor which always precedes the fatal hour voluntarily accepted.

A physiologist might have studied in him the growing symptoms of that febrile absorption known to, and classified by, science, and which is to suffering what voluptuousness is to pleasure. Despair, also, has its ecstasy. Marius had reached this point. He looked on at everything as from without; as we have said, things which passed before him seemed far away; he made out the whole, but did not perceive the details. He beheld men going and coming as through a flame. He heard voices speaking as at the bottom of an abyss. But this moved him. There was in this scene a point which pierced and roused even him.

He had but one idea now, to die; and he did not wish to be turned aside from it, but he reflected, in his gloomy somnambulism, that while destroying himself, he was not prohibited from saving some one else. I join them, and you must make haste. Combeferre has said convincing things to you. There are some among you who have families, mothers, sisters, wives, children. Let such leave the ranks. His authority was great. Enjolras was certainly the head of the barricade, but Marius was its savior. Then, touched by Combeferre's words, shaken by Enjolras' order, touched by Marius' entreaty, these heroic men began to denounce each other.

Each struggled to determine which should not allow himself to be placed at the door of the tomb. Do you yourselves designate those who are to go. They obeyed. After the expiration of a few minutes, five were unanimously selected and stepped out of the ranks. And then a struggle arose as to who should remain, and who should find reasons for the others not remaining. The generous quarrel began afresh. These great revolutionary barricades were assembling points for heroism. The improbable was simple there.

These men did not astonish each other. Marius did not believe that he was capable of another emotion. Still, at this idea, that of choosing a man for death, his blood rushed back to his heart. He would have turned pale, had it been possible for him to become any paler. He advanced towards the five, who smiled upon him, and each, with his eyes full of that grand flame which one beholds in the depths of history hovering over Thermopylae, cried to him:.

And Marius stupidly counted them; there were still five of them! Then his glance dropped to the four uniforms. He had arrived by way of Mondetour lane, whither by dint of inquiries made, or by instinct, or chance. Thanks to his dress of a National Guardsman, he had made his way without difficulty. The sentinel stationed by the insurgents in the Rue Mondetour had no occasion to give the alarm for a single National Guardsman, and he had allowed the latter to entangle himself in the street, saying to himself: "Probably it is a reinforcement, in any case it is a prisoner.

At the moment when Jean Valjean entered the redoubt, no one had noticed him, all eyes being fixed on the five chosen men and the four uniforms. Jean Valjean also had seen and heard, and he had silently removed his coat and flung it on the pile with the rest.

Jean Valjean, without replying, helped the insurgent whom he was saving to don his uniform. THE situation of all in that fatal hour and that pitiless place, had as result and culminating point Enjolras' supreme melancholy. Enjolras bore within him the plenitude of the revolution; he was incomplete, however, so far as the absolute can be so; he had too much of Saint-Just about him, and not enough of Anacharsis Cloots; still, his mind, in the society of the Friends of the A B C, had ended by undergoing a certain polarization from Combeferre's ideas; for some time past, he had been gradually emerging from the narrow form of dogma, and had allowed himself to incline to the broadening influence of progress, and he had come to accept, as a definitive and magnificent evolution, the transformation of the great French Republic, into the immense human republic.

As far as the immediate means were concerned, a violent situation being given, he wished to be violent; on that point, he never varied; and he remained of that epic and redoubtable school which is summed up in the words: "Eighty-three. He was engaged in Page 24 thought; he quivered, as at the passage of prophetic breaths; places where death is have these effects of tripods. A sort of stifled fire darted from his eyes, which were filled with an inward look. All at once he threw back his head, his blond locks fell back like those of an angel on the sombre quadriga made of stars, they were like the mane of a startled lion in the flaming of an halo, and Enjolras cried:.

The streets of cities inundated with light, green branches on the thresholds, nations sisters, men just, old men blessing children, the past loving the present, thinkers entirely at liberty, believers on terms of full equality, for religion heaven, God the direct priest, human conscience become an altar, no more hatreds, the fraternity of the workshop and the school, for sole penalty and recompense fame, work for all, right for all, peace over all, no more bloodshed, no more wars, happy mothers!

To conquer matter is the first step; to realize the ideal is the second. Reflect on what progress has already accomplished. Formerly, the first human races beheld with terror the hydra pass before their eyes, breathing on the waters, the dragon which vomited flame, the griffin who was the monster of the air, and who flew with the wings of an eagle and the talons of a tiger; fearful beasts which were above man. Man, nevertheless, spread his snares, consecrated by intelligence, and finally conquered these monsters. We have vanquished the hydra, and it is called the locomotive; we are on the point of vanquishing the griffin, we already grasp it, and it is called the balloon.

On the day when this Promethean task shall be accomplished, and when man shall have definitely harnessed to his will the triple Chimaera of antiquity, the hydra, the dragon and the griffin, he will be the master of water, fire, and of air, and he will be for the rest of animated creation that which the ancient gods formerly were to him. Courage, and onward! Citizens, whither are we going? To science made government, to the force of things become the sole public force, to the natural law, having in itself its sanction and its penalty and promulgating Page 25 itself by evidence, to a dawn of truth corresponding to a dawn of day.

We are advancing to the union of peoples; we are advancing to the unity of man. No more fictions; no more parasites. The real governed by the true, that is the goal. Civilization will hold its assizes at the summit of Europe, and, later on, at the centre of continents, in a grand parliament of the intelligence. Something similar has already been seen. The amphictyons had two sittings a year, one at Delphos the seat of the gods, the other at Thermopylae, the place of heroes.

Europe will have her amphictyons; the globe will have its amphictyons. France bears this sublime future in her breast. This is the gestation of the nineteenth century. That which Greece sketched out is worthy of being finished by France. Listen to me, you, Feuilly, valiant artisan, man of the people. I revere you. Yes, you clearly behold the future, yes, you are right. You had neither father nor mother, Feuilly; you adopted humanity for your mother and right for your father. You are about to die, that is to say to triumph, here. Citizens, whatever happens to-day, through our defeat as well as through our victory, it is a revolution that we are about to create.

As conflagrations light up a whole city, so revolutions illuminate the whole human race. And what is the revolution that we shall cause? I have just told you, the Revolution of the True. From a political point of view, there is but a single principle; the sovereignty of man over himself.

This sovereignty of myself over myself is called Liberty. Where two or three of these sovereignties are combined, the state begins. But in that association there is no abdication. Each sovereignty concedes a certain quantity of itself, for the purpose of forming the common right.

This quantity is the same for all of us. This identity of concession which each makes to all, is called Equality. Common right is nothing else than the protection of all beaming on the right of each. This protection of all over each is called Fraternity. The point of intersection of all these assembled sovereignties is called society. This intersection being a junction, this point is a knot. Hence what is called the social Page 26 bond. Some say social contract; which is the same thing, the word contract being etymologically formed with the idea of a bond. Let us come to an understanding about equality; for, if liberty is the summit, equality is the base.

Equality, citizens, is not wholly a surface vegetation, a society of great blades of grass and tiny oaks; a proximity of jealousies which render each other null and void; legally speaking, it is all aptitudes possessed of the same opportunity; politically, it is all votes possessed of the same weight; religiously, it is all consciences possessed of the same right.

Equality has an organ: gratuitous and obligatory instruction. The right to the alphabet, that is where the beginning must be made. The primary school imposed on all, the secondary school offered to all, that is the law. From an identical school, an identical society will spring. Yes, instruction! Citizens, the nineteenth century is great, but the twentieth century will be happy.

Then, there will be nothing more like the history of old, we shall no longer, as to-day, have to fear a conquest, an invasion, a usurpation, a rivalry of nations, arms in hand, an interruption of civilization depending on a marriage of kings, on a birth in hereditary tyrannies, a partition of peoples by a congress, a dismemberment because of the failure of a dynasty, a combat of two religions meeting face to face, like two bucks in the dark, on the bridge of the infinite; we shall no longer have to fear famine, farming out, prostitution arising from distress, misery from the failure of work and the scaffold and the sword, and battles and the ruffianism of chance in the forest of events.

One might almost say: There will be no more events. We shall be happy. The human race will accomplish its law, as the terrestrial globe accomplishes its law; harmony will be re-established between the soul and the star; the soul will gravitate around the truth, as the planet around the light.

Friends, the present hour in which I am addressing you, is a gloomy hour; but these are terrible purchases of the future. A revolution is a toll. We Page 27 affirm it on this barrier. Whence should proceed that cry of love, if not from the heights of sacrifice? Oh my brothers, this is the point of junction, of those who think and of those who suffer; this barricade is not made of paving-stones, nor of joists, nor of bits of iron; it is made of two heaps, a heap of ideas, and a heap of woes.

Here misery meets the ideal. The day embraces the night, and says to it: 'I am about to die, and thou shalt be born again with me. Sufferings bring hither their agony and ideas their immortality. This agony and this immortality are about to join and constitute our death. Brothers, he who dies here dies in the radiance of the future, and we are entering a tomb all flooded with the dawn.

Enjolras paused rather than became silent; his lips continued to move silently, as though he were talking to himself, which caused them all to gaze attentively at him, in the endeavor to hear more. There was no applause; but they whispered together for a long time. Speech being a breath, the rustling of intelligences resembles the rustling of leaves. Let the reader recall the state of his soul.

We have just recalled it, everything was a vision to him now. His judgment was disturbed. Marius, let us insist on this point, was under the shadow of the great, dark wings which are spread over those in the death agony. He felt that he had entered the tomb, it seemed to him that he was already on the other side of the wall, and he no longer beheld the faces of the living except with the eyes of one dead. How did M. Fauchelevent come there? Why was he there? What had be come there to do? Marius did not address all these questions to himself.

Besides, since our despair has this Page 28 peculiarity, that it envelops others as well as ourselves, it seemed logical to him that all the world should come thither to die. However, M. Fauchelevent did not speak to him, did not look at him, and had not even the air of hearing him, when Marius raised his voice to say: "I know him. As far as Marius was concerned, this attitude of M.

Fauchelevent was comforting, and, if such a word can be used for such impressions, we should say that it pleased him. He had always felt the absolute impossibility of addressing that enigmatical man, who was, in his eyes, both equivocal and imposing. Moreover, it had been a long time since he had seen him; and this still further augmented the impossibility for Marius' timid and reserved nature.

The five chosen men left the barricade by way of Mondetour lane; they bore a perfect resemblance to members of the National Guard. One of them wept as he took his leave. Before setting out, they embraced those who remained. When the five men sent back to life had taken their departure, Enjolras thought of the man who had been condemned to death. He entered the tap-room. Javert, still bound to the post, was engaged in meditation.

Enjolras himself offered him a glass of water, and, as Javert was pinioned, he helped him to drink. Bind me as you please, but you surely might lay me out on a table like that other man. And with a motion of the head, he indicated the body of M. There was, as the reader will remember, a long, broad table at the end of the room, on which they had been running bullets and making cartridges. All the cartridges having been made, and all the powder used, this table was free.

At Enjolras' command, four insurgents unbound Javert from the post. While they were loosing him, a fifth held a bayonet against his breast. Leaving his arms tied behind his back, they placed about his feet a slender but stout whip-cord, as is done to men on the point of mounting the scaffold, which allowed him to take steps about fifteen inches in length, and made him walk to the table at the end of the room, where they laid him down, closely bound about the middle of the body.

By way of further security, and by means of a rope fastened to his neck, they added to the system of ligatures which rendered every attempt at escape impossible, that sort of bond which is called in prisons a martingale, which, starting at the neck, forks on the stomach, and meets the hands, after passing between the legs. While they were binding Javert, a man standing on the threshold was surveying him with singular attention. The shadow cast by this man made Javert turn his head.

He raised his eyes, and recognized Jean Valjean. He did not even start, but dropped his lids proudly and confined himself to the remark: "It is perfectly simple. THE daylight was increasing rapidly. Not a window was opened, not a door stood ajar; it was the dawn but not the awaking. The end of the Rue de la Chanvrerie, opposite the barricade, had been evacuated by the troops, as we have stated it seemed to be free, and presented itself to passersby with a sinister tranquillity.

Not a living being in the cross-roads, which gleamed white in the light of the sun. Nothing is so mournful as this light in deserted streets. Nothing was to be seen, but there was something to be heard. A mysterious movement was going on at a certain distance. It was evident that the critical moment was approaching. As on the previous evening, the sentinels had come in; but this time all had come.

The barricade was stronger than on the occasion of the first attack. Since the departure of the five, they had increased its height still further. On the advice of the sentinel who had examined the region of the Halles, Enjolras, for fear of a surprise in the rear, came to a serious decision. He had the small gut of the Mondetour lane, which had been left open up to that time, barricaded.

For this purpose, they tore up the pavement for the length of several houses more. In this manner, the barricade, walled on three streets, in front on the Rue de la Chanvrerie, to the left on the Rues du Cygne and de la Petite Truanderie, to the right on the Rue Mondetour, was really almost impregnable; it is true that they were fatally hemmed in there. It had three fronts, but no exit. Enjolras had about thirty paving-stones "torn up in excess," said Bossuet, piled up near the door of the wine-shop. The silence was now so profound in the quarter whence the attack must needs come, that Enjolras had each man resume his post of battle.

Nothing is more curious than a barricade preparing for an assault. Each man selects his place as though at the theatre. They jostle, and elbow and crowd each other. There are some who make stalls of paving-stones. Here is a corner of the wall which is in the way, it is removed; here is a redan which may afford protection, they take shelter behind it. Left- handed men are precious; they take the places that are inconvenient to the rest. Many arrange to fight in a sitting posture. Page 31 They wish to be at ease to kill, and to die comfortably.

In the sad war of June, , an insurgent who was a formidable marksman, and who was firing from the top of a terrace upon a roof, had a reclining-chair brought there for his use; a charge of grape-shot found him out there. As soon as the leader has given the order to clear the decks for action, all disorderly movements cease; there is no more pulling from one another; there are no more coteries; no more asides, there is no more holding aloof; everything in their spirits converges in, and changes into, a waiting for the assailants.

A barricade before the arrival of danger is chaos; in danger, it is discipline itself. Peril produces order. As soon as Enjolras had seized his double-barrelled rifle, and had placed himself in a sort of embrasure which he had reserved for himself, all the rest held their peace. A series of faint, sharp noises resounded confusedly along the wall of paving-stones.

It was the men cocking their guns. Moreover, their attitudes were prouder, more confident than ever; the excess of sacrifice strengthens; they no longer cherished any hope, but they had despair, despair, -- the last weapon, which sometimes gives victory; Virgil has said so. Supreme resources spring from extreme resolutions. To embark in death is sometimes the means of escaping a shipwreck; and the lid of the coffin becomes a plank of safety. As on the preceding evening, the attention of all was directed, we might almost say leaned upon, the end of the street, now lighted up and visible.

They had not long to wait. A stir began distinctly in the Saint-Leu quarter, but it did not resemble the movement of the first attack. A clashing of chains, the uneasy jolting of a mass, the click of brass skipping along the pavement, a sort of solemn uproar, announced that some sinister construction of iron was approaching. There arose a tremor in the bosoms of these peaceful old streets, pierced and built for the fertile circulation of interests and ideas, and which are not made for the horrible rumble of the wheels of war. The fixity of eye in all the combatants upon the extremity of the street became ferocious.

Artillery-men were pushing the piece; it was in firing trim; the fore-carriage had been detached; two upheld the gun- carriage, four were at the wheels; others followed with the caisson. They could see the smoke of the burning lint-stock. The whole barricade fired, the report was terrible; an avalanche of smoke covered and effaced both cannon and men; after a few seconds, the cloud dispersed, and the cannon and men re-appeared; the gun-crew had just finished rolling it slowly, correctly, without haste, into position facing the barricade.

Not one of them had been struck. Then the captain of the piece, bearing down upon the breech in order to raise the muzzle, began to point the cannon with the gravity of an astronomer levelling a telescope. A moment later, squarely planted in the very middle of the street, astride of the gutter, the piece was ready for action. A formidable pair of jaws yawned on the barricade. After the fillip on the nose, the blow from the fist. The army is reaching out its big paw to us. The barricade is going to be severely shaken up. The fusillade tries, the cannon takes.

The excess of tin renders them too tender. Then it comes to pass that they have caves and chambers when looked at from the vent hole. In order to obviate this danger, and to render it possible to force the charge, it may become necessary to return to the process of the fourteenth century, hooping, and to encircle the piece on the outside with a series of unwelded Page 33 steel bands, from the breech to the trunnions. In the meantime, they remedy this defect as best they may; they manage to discover where the holes are located in the vent of a cannon, by means of a searcher.

But there is a better method, with Gribeauval's movable star. In firing at short range, the trajectory is not as rigid as could be desired, the parabola is exaggerated, the line of the projectile is no longer sufficiently rectilinear to allow of its striking intervening objects, which is, nevertheless, a necessity of battle, the importance of which increases with the proximity of the enemy and the precipitation of the discharge. This defect of the tension of the curve of the projectile in the rifled cannon of the sixteenth century arose from the smallness of the charge; small charges for that sort of engine are imposed by the ballistic necessities, such, for instance, as the preservation of the gun-carriage.

In short, that despot, the cannon, cannot do all that it desires; force is a great weakness. A cannon- ball only travels six hundred leagues an hour; light travels seventy thousand leagues a second. Such is the superiority of Jesus Christ over Napoleon. How was the casing of the barricade going to behave under the cannon-balls? Would they effect a breach?

That was the question. While the insurgents were reloading their guns, the artillery-men were loading the cannon. And Gavroche flung himself into the barricade just as the ball dashed against it. He came from the direction of the Rue du Cygne, and he had nimbly climbed over the auxiliary barricade which fronted on the labyrinth of the Rue de la Petite Truanderie. The ball buried itself in the mass of rubbish. At the most there was an omnibus wheel broken, and the old Anceau cart was demolished. On seeing this, the barricade burst into a laugh. THEY flocked round Gavroche. But he had no time to tell anything.

Marius drew him aside with a shudder. And he stared at Marius intently with his epic effrontery. His eyes grew larger with the proud light within them. Gavroche was not without some compunctions in the matter of that letter. In his haste to return to the barricade, he had got rid of it rather than delivered it. He was forced to acknowledge to himself that he had confided it rather lightly to that stranger whose face he had not been able to make out.

It is true that the man was bareheaded, but that was not sufficient. In short, he had been administering to himself little inward remonstrances and he feared Marius' reproaches. In order to extricate himself from the predicament, he took the simplest course; he lied abominably. The lady was asleep. She will have the letter when she wakes up. Marius had had two objects in sending that letter: to bid farewell to Cosette and to save Gavroche. He was obliged to content himself with the half of his desire. The despatch of his letter and the presence of M. Fauchelevent in the barricade, was a coincidence which occurred to him.

He pointed out M. Fauchelevent to Gavroche. Gavroche had, in fact, as we have just mentioned, seen Jean Valjean only at night. The troubled and unhealthy conjectures which had outlined themselves in Marius' mind were dissipated. Did he know M. Fauchelevent's opinions? Perhaps M. Fauchelevent was a republican.

Hence his very natural presence in this combat. In the meanwhile, Gavroche was shouting, at the other end of the barricade: "My gun! Gavroche warned "his comrades" as he called them, that the barricade was blocked. He had had great difficulty in reaching it. A battalion of the line whose arms were piled in the Rue de la Petite Truanderie was on the watch on the side of the Rue du Cygne; on the opposite side, the municipal guard occupied the Rue des Precheurs. The bulk of the army was facing them in front.

A company of infantry of the line had come up and occupied the end of the street behind the piece of ordnance. The soldiers were tearing up the pavement and constructing with the stones a small, low wall, a sort of side-work not more than eighteen inches high, and facing the barricade.

In the angle at the left of this epaulement, there was visible the head of Page 36 the column of a battalion from the suburbs massed in the Rue Saint-Denis. Enjolras, on the watch, thought he distinguished the peculiar sound which is produced when the shells of grape- shot are drawn from the caissons, and he saw the commander of the piece change the elevation and incline the mouth of the cannon slightly to the left. Then the cannoneers began to load the piece. The chief seized the lint-stock himself and lowered it to the vent. The insurgents who were straggling in front of the wine- shop, and who had quitted their posts of combat on Gavroche's arrival, rushed pell-mell towards the barricade; but before Enjolras' order could be executed, the discharge took place with the terrifying rattle of a round of grape-shot.

This is what it was, in fact. The charge had been aimed at the cut in the redoubt, and had there rebounded from the wall; and this terrible rebound had produced two dead and three wounded. If this were continued, the barricade was no longer tenable. The grape-shot made its way in. And, lowering his rifle, he took aim at the captain of the gun, who, at that moment, was bearing down on the breach of his gun and rectifying and definitely fixing its pointing. The captain of the piece was a handsome sergeant of artillery, very young, blond, with a very gentle face, and the intelligent air peculiar to that predestined and redoubtable weapon which, by dint of perfecting itself in horror, must end in killing war.

Come, when there are no more kings, there will be no more war.


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Enjolras, you are taking aim at Page 37 that sergeant, you are not looking at him. Fancy, he is a charming young man; he is intrepid; it is evident that he is thoughtful; those young artillery-men are very well educated; he has a father, a mother, a family; he is probably in love; he is not more than five and twenty at the most; he might be your brother. At the same moment, he pressed the trigger of his rifle. The flame leaped forth. The artillery-man turned round twice, his arms extended in front of him, his head uplifted, as though for breath, then he fell with his side on the gun, and lay there motionless.

They could see his back, from the centre of which there flowed directly a stream of blood. The ball had traversed his breast from side to side. He was dead. He had to be carried away and replaced by another. Several minutes were thus gained, in fact. The firing from the gun was about to begin again. Against that grape- shot, they could not hold out a quarter of an hour longer. It was absolutely necessary to deaden the blows.

Jean Valjean, who was seated apart on a stone post, at the Page 38 corner of the tavern, with his gun between his knees, had, up to that moment, taken no part in anything that was going on. He did not appear to hear the combatants saying around him: "Here is a gun that is doing nothing. It will be remembered that, on the arrival of the rabble in the Rue de la Chanvrerie, an old woman, foreseeing the bullets, had placed her mattress in front of her window. This window, an attic window, was on the roof of a six-story house situated a little beyond the barricade.

The mattress, placed cross-wise, supported at the bottom on two poles for drying linen, was upheld at the top by two ropes, which, at that distance, looked like two threads, and which were attached to two nails planted in the window frames. These ropes were distinctly visible, like hairs, against the sky. Jean Valjean fired the second charge. The second rope lashed the panes of the attic window. The mattress slipped between the two poles and fell into the street.

The mattress had, in fact, fallen outside the barricade, between besiegers and besieged. Now, the death of the sergeant of artillery having exasperated the troop, the soldiers had, for several minutes, been lying flat on their stomachs behind the line of paving-stones which they had erected, and, in order to supply the forced silence of the piece, which was quiet while its service was in course of reorganization, they had opened fire on the barricade. The insurgents did not reply to this musketry, in order to spare their ammunition Page 39 The fusillade broke against the barricade; but the street, which it filled, was terrible.

Jean Valjean stepped out of the cut, entered the street, traversed the storm of bullets, walked up to the mattress, hoisted it upon his back, and returned to the barricade. He placed the mattress in the cut with his own hands. He fixed it there against the wall in such a manner that the artillery-men should not see it. The cannon vomited forth its package of buck-shot with a roar. But there was no rebound. The effect which they had foreseen had been attained. The barricade was saved. Triumph of that which yields over that which strikes with lightning. But never mind, glory to the mattress which annuls a cannon!

Her chamber was narrow, neat, unobtrusive, with a long sash-window, facing the East on the back court-yard of the house. Cosette knew nothing of what was going on in Paris. She had not been there on the preceding evening, and she had already retired to her chamber when Toussaint had said:. Cosette had slept only a few hours, but soundly. She had had sweet dreams, which possibly arose from the fact that her little bed was very white. Some one, who was Marius, had appeared to her in the light. She awoke with the sun Page 40 in her eyes, which, at first, produced on her the effect of being a continuation of her dream.

Her first thought on emerging from this dream was a smiling one. Cosette felt herself thoroughly reassured. Like Jean Valjean, she had, a few hours previously, passed through that reaction of the soul which absolutely will not hear of unhappiness. Sidney, Geordie, Leonard, and Mrs. Maguire all take steps in a new direction. Sidney tries to right a wrong. Maguire has some of her questions answered and turns a new leaf. Amanda gives Sidney an ultimatum. An unwelcome note leads to a disastrous meeting.

Tillie attempts to stop Captain Dreyfuss and Rose from making a terrible mistake. Jane is faced with several harsh realities in both her professional and personal life. The investigations around the murder of Julie Ann Collins and the robbery plan of the Bentley family come to a head. Sidney and Geordie must determine the connection between a murder and a number of post office robberies. Leonard becomes the village hero. Sidney, Geordie, and Leonard all find themselves at crossroads in their personal lives.

Tennison and Bradfield continue their work on the murder case of a young girl, but a breach of police protocol complicates matters. Meanwhile, the Bentley family continues their plans to pull off their biggest crime yet. When several villagers become ill at the local cricket match, Geordie and Sidney must determine if it was an accident or something more sinister. Sidney and Amanda learn that their secret isn't so secret after all.

Nurse Tillie comes to the rescue, but will it be too late? Stolen paint provokes a theological crisis. Jane Tennison learns the cold facts of police work and becomes immersed in a murder investigation. A mysterious death and the unsettling appearance of a dead bird at the vicarage lead Sidney and Geordie down a dark path.

Leonard forges a bond with a woman close to the case. Amanda and Sidney are blissfully in love Rose meets Capt. Emma goes on a date and incites an international incident. Rose defends an airman. This drama imagines Prince Charles' ascension to the throne following Queen Elizabeth's death. In the season two finale, everyone prepares for a wedding.

Even as the allies cheer for victory in the Battle of Britain, there's one more twist of fate in store for the citizens of Great Paxford. Steph risks losing the farm. Sarah finds herself in a dangerous situation, while Teresa has a big decision to make. Alison discovers the real reason behind the parachute accidents - but can she warn Frances before it's too late? Teresa is asked on a date. Alison worries that her involvement with the Lyons could be dangerous.

The Brindsleys make a disturbing discovery. Meanwhile, there's joyful news in the Campbell house, and Joyce unexpectedly joins forces with Erica. Frances learns that there is more to Peter's affair than she realized. Steph is concerned by Stan's behavior on the farm. The Brindsleys receive some wonderful news.

The attraction between Pat and Marek grows, but the risk of acting on their feelings is huge. At the reading of his will, Frances discovers that Peter was keeping a secret from her. In June , Pat befriends a Czech soldier as Britain faces the threat of imminent invasion. Sarah receives some shocking news about Adam, but her sorrow is overshadowed by a tragedy for Frances. A chronicle of the Bronte sisters' battle to overcome obstacles and publish their novels, which would become some of the greatest in the English language. In the season finale, on the verge of delivering her first child, Victoria spurns advice and ventures among her subjects.

Miss Skerrett and Francatelli reach their decisive moment. With a child on the way, Victoria must choose a regent in case she dies during childbirth. The Tory party disputes her choice, but she and Albert turn the tables with the aid of the latest in 19th-century technology. At loose ends in a foreign land, Albert finds a noble cause. Victoria gets her way at court and resorts to a folk cure in the bedroom.

Francatelli does Miss Skerrett a favor - for a price. Courtship at court leads to second thoughts and other complications. Will Victoria and Albert take the fateful step into matrimony? And will the queen promise "to obey" her foreign prince? Albert pays a visit against the queen's wishes and meets royal disdain. Where could it possibly lead? Meanwhile, the mystery of Miss Skerrett's past deepens.

Facing rioters and suitors, Victoria grows into her royal role. As she ponders marriage, her friendship with Lord Melbourne grows more complex. As a new queen, the young Victoria struggles to take charge amid plots to manipulate her. Her friendship with the prime minister leads to a crisis in Parliament. Long-buried secrets catch up with the Baker Street duo. Someone has been playing a long game indeed and Sherlock and Watson face their greatest challenge. Is the game finally over? In the season 4 premiere, Holmes awaits Moriarty's posthumous move and becomes preoccupied with why someone is destroying images of the late prime minister Margaret Thatcher.

In the Season 2 finale, the wars tempt Ross and Dwight. An enraged mob threatens George and Elizabeth. Caroline and Dwight have a fateful reunion. Ross and Demelza confront their demons. A fateful roadblock awaits. Cynthia makes a surprise investment. Sooni has a rite of passage. Demelza and Ross wage bitter war. Elizabeth postpones a big event. Demelza toys with temptation. Ross's good deed is repaid. Big plans are afoot, but the Durrells can't decide whether to proceed. Larry faces a crisis -and he's not the only one.

Margo's countess makes a breakthrough. With treason charges pending, Aafrin faces a dire fate. Alice's prospects are no less grim. Ralph's destiny is also in the balance-not helped by Ian's disclosure of Ralph's role in the Sood case. For once, Ross plays the game he despises. George is on the brink of success. The copper mine yields a glimpse of hope. Ross reaches a breaking point. Louisa's aunt arrives from England to a string of mishaps.

Bad moods and bad luck threaten to end the Durrells' Greek idyll. Sven comes to the rescue. Alice and Aafrin hatch an ambitious plan with Cynthia's help. Sooni chooses a husband. Ralph is double-crossed. Ian gets a clue in a cold case. A fugitive points the way to riches. Ross and the free traders sail into a trap. Caroline and Dwight hatch a plan. Demelza faces house arrest. Leslie gets thrown out of the house and ends up in court. Theo and Spiros are his attorneys.

Margo settles into her new job-and a new dress. Louisa has more man trouble. Three rivals vie for Sooni. The Maharajah tests Ralph and Madeline. Sarah starts a newlife. Aafrin and Alice play with fire. Cynthia opens up about the past. Ross does Elizabeth a favor. A mysterious benefactor reciprocates. The search is on forMark, who knows where secret riches lie.

George starts plan C against Ross. Gerry's new soulmate has a surprising background. Leslie suffers the pangs of heartbreak. Louisa has another go with Sven and Margo takes a stab at the medical profession. Naresh executes a diabolical plan. Aafrin tries desperately to stop it. Ralph finally puts two and two together. Simla's populace turns out innocently for a picnic. George maneuvers Poldark toward checkmate. The law hunts down free traders. Carolinechooses between Unwin and Dwight. Francis goes missing.

At wits' end, Louisa orders her children to put food on the table. Larry bites the bullet and goes hunting. Meanwhile, Margo, Leslie, and Gerry pursue their various love interests. Lord Hawthorne wants Adam arrested for setting him afire. Alice and Aafrin's affair teeterson exposure. A marriage descends into sadism. The dead and presumed dead return. Smugglers make Ross an offer. Ross makes Francis an offer. Verity reappears. Ross andGeorge engage in a frank discussion.

Demelza risks her neck before a blessed event. In the series opener, Louisa Durrell and her four headstrong children arrive penniless on the Greek island of Corfu in They soon fall in with the locals and a menagerie of animals. Sooni confronts Aafrin and receives a shock. Madeline tries to line up a key ally for Ralph.

Lord Hawthorne's interest in Leena deepens dangerously. George tries plan B against Ross. Jud pays a steep price for treachery. Francis has a meeting of minds with his cousin. Demelza breaks difficult news. Sooni and Ian compare notes to solve the mystery of Kaira's murder. Aafrin intrudes on a domestic scene. The Maharajah arrives with his latest flame, a familiar face. In the Season 2 premiere, George plots against Ross, who fights all attempts to save him; Francis takes a desperate step; and Demelza tries to influence a hanging judge.

Aafrin saves his friend's life, but gets a gruesome payback. Ralph's ambition faces a roadblock. Sooni feels family pressure and Madeline extracts the truth. Three years have passed since last season. Aafrin is secretly fighting for Indian independence from inside the civil service. Does Ralph suspect his disloyalty? Michael Gambon stars as Winston Churchill in this dramatization of Churchill's life-threatening stroke in , when he was prime minister. His illness was kept secret from the world. Romola Garai plays the remarkable nurse who cared for him.

In the series finale, Lewis and Hathaway investigate a bomb attack that killed an eminent mathematician - a notorious philanderer with many enemies. When a bomb is discovered at his brother's home, the case moves in another direction. Lewis and Hathaway anticipate more murders when they find an alchemic image purposefully left at the scene of an Oxford dean's bludgeoning death.

A tattoo on his body and those of two more victims leads to a frantic effort to prevent another murder. Learn if Lewis, who needs to prove himself to a new boss, and Hathaway can establish a connection between the remains of a body discovered in a well and the death of a young artist. Hathaway finally gets to know his estranged father.

Endeavour, occupied with unexpected strife in his personal life, finds himself drawn to a woman he's investigating. The grisly murder of a man who works in fashion causes a shake-up in Oxford's criminal underworld. Endeavour ventures into the disparate worlds of Oxford scientific academia, the city's vast parks, night school, and the Oxfordshire countryside when a Dutch au pair goes missing. The death of an artist in a house-fire leaves Oxford police baffled. Then, when a young housewife dies seemingly of a mysterious "tummy bug" that has sickened half the police force, Morse's investigation leads him to an inner-city supermarket.

In the series finale, the press links Harry with Jimmy's demise. Suppliers refuse to sell and stockholders are up in arms. Meanwhile, the store's 20th anniversary sale approaches. With his memory failing, Wallander draws on primal instincts to crack a decades-old submarine mystery. But is it finally curtains for Kurt? Josie takes on a new role and an old one. Whiteleys' troubles lead Jimmy and Mr.

Crabb to take a big risk. Found out, Jimmy takes desperate measures. A knife-slashed corpse takes Wallander on a chase for the victim's missing daughter. Increasingly forgetful, he breaks a cardinal rule of policing. The Whiteleys deal starts to look bad. A reporter confronts Jimmy. Grove undertakes a good deed and a new project before retiring. Harry and Mae also retire. The case of a missing Swede in South Africa leads Wallander down a dangerous path. Worst of all, he's having blackouts.

A former employee is laid to rest. Kitty and Frank reach an understanding and Grove confronts Tilly. Jimmy thinks he's a hunted man, even as he makes the deal of his life. In the season finale, Sidney seeks oblivion and his friend Sam seeks forgiveness. A dead girl's parents seek revenge.

Amanda seeks Sidney. Also, Leonard finally takes a stand. Jimmy comes up with a plan to save Harry's bacon. Gordon gives in. One couple breaks up and another ties the knot. Plus, a love triangle meets an unfortunate end. Will Gary go to the gallows? Will Geordie go to prison? Are Sidney and Geordie'scrime fighting days over? The case of a suspicious death takes a surprising turn. Grove and Josie make a new start. Frank is in the doghouse. Movie mogul Harry courts trouble with a mob boss and a press lord.

An apparent suicide leads Sidney to perform an exorcism. Gary goes on trial. Leonard bets on a longshot. Margaret makes her move and Amanda confronts her lost love. Frank turns into prey at a swank junket for the press. Josie arrives to console Grove. Harry faces a choice: settle a gambling debt or bankroll the Dolly twins' dream job. Sidney and Geordie answer a false alarm, which turns into a real murder investigation. Amanda gets into trouble. Things get more serious with Margaret.

To Gordon's horror, Harry and Jimmy make a high-risk deal. A professor dies in a suspicious fall. A government agent warns Geordie to back offthe case. Meanwhile, Sidney is warned off an old flame but finds a new prospect. Wheeler-dealer Jimmy Dillon makes his cocky entrance. The Groves are at loose ends. Harry has a run-in with the Queen of Time. The Dolly sisters mar Mae's fashion show.

Sidney is suspected of murder. But then so are a fellow priest, a photographer, anda classmate of the victim. Geordie makes up his mind about who will hang. After six passionate and poignant seasons, the curtain comes down on "Downton Abbey. Two romances get complicated. Molesley and Spratt try out new jobs. Thomas takes a fateful step. Patmore provokes a scandal. Isobel puts her foot down. A car race gives Mary flashbacks. Patmore opens for business. Hughes tricks Carson. Things get serious for Edith. Robert gets a surprise gift. The hospital war reaches a climax. Violet goes on the warpath.

Daisy tries to foil a romance. Prospects are looking up for Mary and Edith. Thomas feels trapped. Thomas makes Andy a generous offer. Spratt rescues Denker. A powerful politician comes to dinner. Robert upsets the family. Mary gets suspicious. Miss Baxter faces a dilemma, Anna and Mary rush to London, Daisy continues to press her case, and a former maid comes to lunch.

A wedding dress drama takes a disastrous turn, a handsome volunteer helps Edith meet a deadline, and the hospital debate gets nasty. Wedding plans hit a snag, pigs lead to trouble for Edith and Marigold, Thomas gets a hint, Anna has a secret appointment, and Violet and Isobel lock horns over health care.

Extortion and downsizing threaten Downton Abbey and change is afoot at the hospital. Hughes poses a delicate question. Daisy speaks her mind and Anna and Bates wait for the word. Thomas Ricoletti is surprised to see his wife dressed in her old wedding gown because, just a few hours before, she took her own life. Ricoletti's ghost now appears to be prowling the streets of London with an unslakeable thirst for revenge. From fog-shrouded Limehouse to the bowels of a ruined church, Holmes, Watson, and their friends must use all their cunning to combat an enemy seemingly from beyond the grave.

In the Season 1 finale, Madeleine gets a shock. Ramu's fate is in Ralph's hands. Aafrin makes two fateful decisions, and Ian becomes a local hero. While Simla citizens look on, Ramu is tried for Jaya's murder. Leena and Ian come to his defense. Sarah is humiliated. A murder victim is found and a suspect confesses.

Ian finds a cause and Aafrin is blackmailed. Meanwhile, the British Club performs Oscar Wilde. In the Season 1 finale, Alison tries to escape her troubles before the jig is up. Miriam experiences despair and joy. Pat is freed from tyranny and Laura's secret is out. A mountaineer makes trouble. Aafrin and Alice try to check their growing attraction. Ralph's covert appointment is thwarted by tragedy. Frances welcomes an evacuee.

Laura follows her sister's footsteps. Spencer is shunned. Teresa gets bad news and makes a confession. Ralph plays politics at his engagement bash. Eugene tells Cynthia a shocking secret. Adam and his mother make a surprise visit. Frances plans an air raid shelter and Steph hides a secret that threatens the farm. Kate gets shattering news. The viceroy gets a royal welcome.

A crucial piece of evidence is missing. Aafrin sends Alice on an urgent errand. Ian gets bad news. Alison takes desperate steps to pay a bill. Claire asks Spencer out. Pat makes a speech but pays the consequences. Sooni gets into trouble. Witness-tampering runs riot. Ramu confronts Armitage at the annual fair. Dougie confesses to Sarah. Pat endures abuse. Alison's dog has a close call. The local doctor faces up to his fate.

While Aafrin fights for his life, Ralph confronts the gunman in jail. Sarah is suspicious of Alice's past.

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Adam goes missing. Frances tries to revive the group with a jam-making project. The British arrive at their summer headquarters in northern India for a season of parties, romance, and trouble - including attempted murder. Sir Arthur and Woodie close in on the Wyrley Ripper. But have they found their man? Jean makes her decision. Sir Arthur and Woodie get a shock after they order their driver to "follow that carriage! Julian Barnes' novel begins with famed author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle asked to clear a man convicted of animal mutilation. In short order, he realizes that there's more to the case than meets the eye.

When Verity makes her move, Poldark is blamed and events spiral out of control. An epidemic leads to tragedy. A shipwreck is both a blessing and a curse. A mysterious smelting company challenges the local copper barons. Poldark confronts the same cardsharp who swindled Francis. Poldark and Demelza start a family and Demelza plays matchmaker. The miners riot. Francis takes desperate measures to recoup his losses.

The community awaits news of the fish harvest. Poldark's copper mine struggles. Demelza must get used to a new way of life. Poldark's battle with the local gentry deepens. He faces one turning point with Elizabeth and another with Demelza. Determined to open his risky copper mine, Poldark seeks backers. Verity's big chance leads to a showdown. After fighting in the American Revolution, Poldark returns to Cornwall and finds wrenching change.

In the season finale, the store throws the sale to end all sales. Cupid also makes some final decisions. In the season one finale, Henry's love for Anne Boleyn has given way to anger and distrust. Henry instructs Cromwell to rid him of his second queen. Sensing her loss of favor, the queen's enemies gather. The store takes a big gamble. Victor hits on a survival strategy. Gordon and Grace test the waters. And Grove snaps out of it. Wolf Hall - Episode Five. With Anne pregnant again and away from court, Henry begins to take notice of Jane Seymour. Anne hears of this and threatens Cromwell to make terms with her before her son is born.

But has she overplayed her cards? Harry and Victor spiral deeper into despair. So do Mardle and Grove. Serge and Violette fly high after a crash. Wolf Hall - Episode Four. Anne gives birth to a baby girl, failing to produce Henry's longed-for male heir. Cromwell demands the nobility and church swear an oath acknowledging Anne as lawful queen, but will Thomas More agree? Gordon's debut as store deputy skirts scandal. Kitty confronts her attackers. Doris wrestles with a dilemma, then takes a tragic step. Wolf Hall - Episode Three. With the cardinal dead, it falls to Cromwell to orchestrate a marriage between the king and Anne Boleyn.

The king rewards Cromwell for his loyalty, but he is being closely watched by his enemies. When Locksley makes a surprise move, Harry ups the stakes. Princess Marie makes her own move. Victor and Violette are caught off guard. Wolf Hall - Episode Two. Cardinal Wolsey has been forced to move to York. Cromwell remains in London, seeking to return the cardinal to the king's favor.

As Cromwell's relationship with Henry deepens, there is unexpected news from the north. Surprising accomplices turn up in the search for Kitty's assailants. Agnes and Henri call it quits, and Harry and Nancy reach an understanding. Wolf Hall - Episode One. In the series opener, Cardinal Wolsey is stripped of his powers after having failed to secure the annulment of the King Henry's marriage to Katherine of Aragon.

His hopes of returning to the king's favor lie with the ever-loyal Thomas Cromwell. Harry attends a fateful auction. Henri has a flashback. Edwards' new book instigates a crisis for Kitty. In the season opener, Harry and his family attempt to move on with their lives after the death of his wife, Rose. Henri returns from war but struggles to adjust to life back at home and an old enemy resurfaces.

The Crawleys go to a shooting party at a castle in Northumberland and return to Downton for a joyful Christmas holiday. In the season one finale, Geordie's life hangs in the balance as Sidney defies the police to stop a killing spree. Sidney's romantic life falls apart. Sidney and Geordie happen upon a murder while visiting London and show Scotland Yard a thing or two.

Edith is found out. Mary finally shakes a suitor. Isobel and Lord Merton reveal their plans. Robert throws another guest out of the house.

A shocking murder reveals the depths of homophobia in Cambridge. Geordie crosses swords with Sidney. An ancient spark flares in Violet's heart.


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While police deepen their probe, Bates tells Anna the truth. A long and painful mystery is solved. Sidney investigates when an old woman dies shortly after telling him that someone wants her dead. The new curate delivers a surprising sermon. Rose makes a handsome new acquaintance. Something is wrong with Thomas. Edith's link to Marigold draws attention. Bricker and Robert lose control. Sidney's former flame throws an engagement party that leads to murder. To crack the case, Sidney and Geordie must break a code of silence.

In the season opener, it looks like suicide, but Reverend Sidney Chambers suspects murder. His biggest challenge is to enlist police in the hunt for the killer. Mary and Lord Gillingham put their love to the test. Bates also faces a trial. Cora makes a new friend, and Violet is reunited with an old one. Rose hits on a strategy to get a radio in the house. Sarah tutors Daisy.

An art historian arrives. Anna makes a difficult purchase. A working-class prime minister is elected and old attitudes start to change. Robert is snubbed by the village. Baxter tells all, and Edith plays with fire. The Worricker trilogy concludes with Johnny and Margot managing to stay ahead of an international dragnet all across Europe. In the season finale, Clemence returns, bringing emotions to a boil.

Denise, Moray, Katherine, and Tom reach a mutual understanding. A ghost story brings Moray and Denise back together. A traveling photographer makes a big impression on Clara. In the conclusion, a suspect goes on trial for his life, while Elizabeth pursues the truth behind a mysterious death. The future of Darcy's sister, Georgiana, also hangs in the balance.

Moray and Tom raise the stakes in their battle for The Paradise. Denise pursues her own plan. Lovett suffers a crisis. Six years after "Pride and Prejudice," Elizabeth and Darcy plan a ball with fatal consequences. A family enemy takes charge of the case. An heirloom watch incites sales, seduction and sorcery at the Paradise.

The protagonists find themselves in new roles. Thirteen years after Detective Lewis' first successful arrest, the case is re-opened for appeal. Lewis fears the worst but nothing can prepare him for a new string of murders resembling the original murders. Denise faces her first personnel problem, while Moray sets a desperate plan in motion. Myrtle also confronts a crisis. The detectives discover murky motives while investigating the murder of Rose, an American Classics student.

Hathaway gets to work on his first case as an inspector with his new partner, DS Lizzie Maddox. Lewis, struggling to adapt to retired life, jumps at the chance to investigate a complicated crime. Miss Marple investigates several suspicious deaths believed to have been caused by a gypsy curse. Time has not stood still since last season's wedding disaster.

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Moray, Denise, and Katherine reunite under a new regime. Miss Marple finds work and lodging for an old family friend and her son at Greenshaw's Folly, the home of an eccentric botanist. All seems well, until the house's loyal butler dies unexpectedly. While staying at a lavish tropical island hotel, Miss Marple investigates the sudden death of a fellow guest. Otto and Elizabeth's strange marriage becomes plain. Jean forms an unlikely bond with Margaret. A climactic series of events is kicked off by a swimsuit contest. The intertwined fates of doctors, nurses, spouses, and a police inspector converge.

A procedure goes wrong for Otto, Charlie, and Jean. Elizabeth and Mulligan meet for a showdown. Angela and Otto have an out-of-town trip with a chaperone. Brilliant surgeon Otto, married to Elizabeth, has eyes for new nurse Angela. Angela's sister, Jean, is engaged to Otto's colleague Richard.

Inspector Mulligan snoops around. Poirot reluctantly attends the party of a wealthy financier where a "murder hunt" game may turn out to be a real murder. Belgian super sleuth Hercule Poirot investigates the shocking death of a Russian chess grandmaster. Morse investigates the cases of a missing boy, a dead journalist, and an absconder from an open prison. The investigation exposes corruption on the police force and misconduct in the upper echelons of Oxford society.

Morse and Thursday work to narrow the list of possible suspects before the Oxford strangler strikes again. When an elderly man is murdered with a ceremonial dagger, the investigation leads to an isolated and dreary school for girls. Digging into the school's disturbing history, Morse learns about a series of murders that took place almost years before to the day.

A dead man's mysterious final message leads Morse to believe the death was not a routine suicide. He begins to consider seemingly unrelated cases, causing Thursday to worry about Morse's mental state. With the tables turned, Will battles for justice by fair means and foul. But can a brilliant attorney save his own skin? Star defense lawyer Will Burton finds his happy family life threatened when he takes the case of an unsavory suspect accused of a torture killing. Justice is served, and so is romance as soldiers return and others leave for the front. All remains calm at Selfridges.

Harry's secret service contact does him a favor. Mae and Loxley cross swords. LeClair gets good news - and bad. Members of the staff are dying at the front. Miss Mardle and her lodger fall in love. LeClair's troubles deepen and so do Harry's. Loxley's corrupt empire expands, LeClair lands in deep trouble, Victor and Agnes make plans, and Harry joins the war effort. The start of World War I spurs enlistment fever among the male staff.

Ladies organize a benefit for refugees. LeClair has a mysterious obsession. All await Churchill's appearance at the store. Rose returns from America for the store's fifth anniversary. Agnes returns from training in Paris. Lord Loxley returns to torture Lady Mae. Lady Rose meets the Prince of Wales and faces a dilemma. Trouble also plagues Cora's mother and brother, Edith, and almost everyone else at Downton Abbey. Robert and Thomas return from America. Bates disappears for a day, Edith prepares to go abroad, suitors flock to Mary, and Rose makes her move.

When Robert and Thomas make a sudden trip, everyone's life becomes more complicated. Mary and Blake come together over pigs. An unwelcome visitor appears. Rose's surprise party for Robert risks scandal. Mary meets an old suitor, and Edith gets troubling news. Sherlock faces his biggest challenge of all - delivering a Best Man's speech on John's wedding day.

Can Bates learn what's troubling Anna? Meanwhile, Thomas installs a new ally and Alfred takes up cooking. Two years after the devastating events of 'The Reichenbach Fall', John appears to get on with his life. But, with London under threat of a devastating terrorist attack, Sherlock is about to take John at his word, staging his resurrection. Love is in the air at Downton Abbey, and darker emotions too, as Mary, Edith, Tom, and Anna each struggle with a dilemma.

The fates of several characters converge at a glittering house party. Gregson impresses Robert, and Anna faces trouble. Following Matthew's untimely death, Mary is struggles to come to terms with her loss, while Robert and Violet disagree on how best to help her through it. As the big day approaches, Moray cannot deny his love for Denise and plans to call off the wedding. Denise proves her aptitude for business again, though not all the shopkeepers are easily convinced.

Denise tries to keep her feelings for Moray to herself, but Miss Audrey sees telltale signs of love. Moray forges ahead with his plans to buy up the other shops on the street. Some light is shed on Jonas' mysterious past and Denise learns a lesson when her latest idea doesn't go as planned. Miss Audrey falls ill and Moray must appoint one of the girls as her substitute. Meanwhile, Katherine is enjoying the affections of new suitor Peter Adler, but she is still conflicted about her lingering feelings for Moray. When a baby is found in the Ladieswear department, everyone at The Paradise becomes caught up in the commotion.

Denise is faced with a situation which forces her to use all her cunning and take a bold step. Young and ambitious country girl Denise Lovett arrives in a booming northern city and takes a job at The Paradise, the glittering department store across from her uncle's drapery shop. It's not long before her beauty and talent catch the eye of the store's dashing owner, John Moray.

Foyle is tasked with protecting Karl Strasser, a Nazi officer turned MI5 informant who believes he's in danger. America wants Strasser extradited for his involvement in a wartime event, but British Intelligence is determined to protect him. A severely injured man drags himself to a hospital, only to die shortly after being found by a nurse and doctor.

As Foyle makes inquiries, he discovers a mysterious military facility full of secrets that could threaten British Intelligence. MI5 asks Foyle to investigate the possibility of a Russian spy network in the heart of London. During his inquiry, Foyle learns that his former driver, Sam, has been working for one of the possible suspects. Both Martha and Clive have their Silk interviews and Martha takes on the biggest case of her life: defending a repeat offender on a murder charge at the Old Bailey. As the pressure continues to mount for Martha and the pupils, Clive receives some astonishing news that could change not only his personal life, but life at chambers for everyone.

Barrister Martha Costello is under pressure to win cases as she aspires to rise to the rank of Queen's Counsel, also known as "taking Silk. Maxine Peake and Rupert Penry-Jones star. While studying for his upcoming sergeant's exam, Morse investigates the hit-and-run death of an eminent Oxford professor. Morse must choose between the responsibilities of his job and loyalty to his mentor.

A royal visit to a family-owned munitions factory ends with murder. Morse delves into the family's murky past as he attempts to uncover the culprit. Morse and Thursday are confronted with a new breed of murderer, as a string of Oxford homicides continues with no end in sight.