PDF Lesson Plans The Book of Laughter and Forgetting

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Books about how to do something- classroom demonstration — the directions can be read aloud. Write the pros and cons opinion of a book after careful study. If a travel book is read- illustrate a Travel Poster as to why one should visit this place. A vivid oral or written description of an interesting character. Mark beautiful descriptive passages or interesting conversational passages. Tell a story with a musical accompaniment. Make a list of new and unusual words and expressions. A pantomime acted out for a guessing game. Write a letter to a friend about the book.

Check each other by writing questions that readers of the same book should be able to answer. Make a time-line for a historical book. Broadcast a book review over the schools PA system. Research and tell a brief biography about the author. Make models of things read about in the book.

The Book of Laughter and Forgetting

Make a colorful mural depicting the book. A picture or caption about laughter for humorous books. Compare one book with a similar book. Think of a new adventure for the main character. Write a script for an interview with the main character. Retell the story to a younger grade. Choral reading with poetry. Adding original stanzas to poetry. Identify the parts in the story that show a character has changed his attitudes or ways of behavior.

Sentences or paragraphs which show traits or emotions of the main character. Parts of the story which compare the actions of two or more characters. A part that describes a person, place or thing. A part of the story that you think could not have really happened. A part that proves a personal opinion that you hold. A part which you believe is the climax of the story. The conversation between two characters.

Pretend you are the main character and retell the story. Work with a small group of students. Plan for one to read orally while the others pantomime the action. Write a letter to one of the characters. Write a biographical sketch of one character. Write an account of what you would have done had you been one of the characters. Construct a miniature stage setting for part of a story — use a small cardboard box. Children enjoy preparing a monologue from a story. Marking particularly descriptive passages for oral reading gives the reader and his audience an opportunity to appreciate excellent writing, and gives them a chance to improve their imagery and enlarge their vocabulary.

The child who likes to make lists of new unusual and interesting words and expressions to add to his vocabulary might share such a list with others, using them in the context of the story. Giving a synopsis of a story is an excellent way of gaining experience in arranging events in sequences and learning how a story progresses to a climax.

Using information in a book to make a scrapbook about the subject. A puppet show planned to illustrate the story. Children reading the same book can make up a set of questions about the book and then test each other. Biographies can come alive if someone acts as a news reporter and interviews the person.

Preparing a book review to present to a class at a lower level is an excellent experience in story- telling and gives children an understanding of how real authors must work to prepare books for children. Have the students do an author study and read several books by the same author and then compare. Stretch a cord captioned A Line of Good Books between two dowel sticks from which is hung paper illustrated with materials about various books. Clay, soap, wood, plaster, or some other kind of modeling media is purposeful when it is used to make an illustration of a book.

Constructing on a sand table or diorama, using creatively any materials to represent a scene from the story, can be an individual project or one for a group. A bulletin board with a caption about laughter or a picture of someone laughing at excerpts from funny stories rewritten by the children from material in humorous books. Video tape oral book reports and then have the children take turns taking the video home for all to share. Be Book Report Pen Pals and share book reports with children in another school.

Do a costumed presentation of your book. Dress either as the author or one of the characters. Write a letter from one character to another character. Write the first paragraph or two for a sequel. Outline what would happen in the rest of book. Write a new conclusion. Write a new beginning. If a journey was involved, draw a map with explanatory notes of significant places. Make a diorama and explain what it shows.

Make a diorama showing the setting or a main event from the book. Make a new jacket with an original blurb. Use e-mail to tell a reading pen pal about the book. Participate with three or four classmates in a television talk show about the book. With another student, do a pretend interview with the author or with one of the characters. Cut out magazine pictures to make a collage or a poster illustrating the idea of the book.

Lead a small group discussion with other readers of the same book. Keep a reading journal and record your thoughts at the end of each period of reading. Write a book review for a class publication. Find a song or a poem that relates to the theme of your book. Explain the similarities. For fun, exaggerate either characteristics or events and write a tabloid-style news story related to your book. Draw a comic-book page complete with bubble-style conversations showing an incident in your book.

Use a journalistic style and write a news story about something that happened to one of the characters. Write a paragraph telling about the title. Is it appropriate? Why not? Decide on an alternate title for the book. Why is it appropriate? Is it better than the one the book has now?

Why or Why not? Make a poster advertising your book. Make a travel brochure inviting tourists to visit the setting of the book. What types of activities would there be for them to attend? Write a letter to the main character of the book. Write the letter he or she sends back.

Make three or more puppets of the characters in the book. Prepare a short puppet show to tell the story to the class. Write a description of one of the main characters. Draw or cut out a picture to accompany the description. Make an ID card which belongs to one of the characters. Be sure to make the card look like the cards for that particular state. Include a picture and all information found on and ID card. Must include some "thought" questions.

Rewrite the story as a picture book. Use simple vocabulary so that it may be enjoyed by younger students. Write a diary as the main character would write it to explain the events of the story. Must have at least 5 entries. Make a dictionary containing 20 or more difficult words from the book.

The Book of Laughter and Forgetting Lesson Plans

Describe the problem or conflict existing for the main character in the book. Tell how the conflict was or was not resolved. Make a mobile showing pictures or symbols of happenings in the book. Make a collage representing some event or part of your book. Make a crossword puzzle using ideas from a book.

Need at least 25 entries. Choose any topic from your book and write a page research report on it. Include a one paragraph explanation as to how it applies to your book not in the paper itself—on your "title page. Write a song for your story.

The Book of Laughter and Forgetting Summary & Study Guide

Pretend you are a teacher, preparing to teach your novel to the entire class. Create 5 journal prompts. Make a comic strip of your story. Make a display of the time period of your book. Make a banner of cloth or paper about your book. Create a movie announcement for your book. Create a radio ad for your book. Write out the script and tape record it as it would be presented. Make a "wanted" poster for one of the characters or objects in your book. Research and write a 1 page report on the geographical setting of your story. Include an explanation as to why this setting was important to the effect of the story.

Design an advertising campaign to promote the sale of the book you read. Include each of the following: a poster, a radio or TV commercial, a magazine or newspaper ad, a bumper sticker, and a button. Find the top 10 web sites a character in your book would most frequently visit. Include sentences for each on why your character likes each of the sites. After you have written the scene, explain how it would have changed the outcome of the book. Create a board game based on events and characters in the book you read.

By playing your game, members of the class should learn what happened in the book. Your game must include the following: a game board, a rule sheet and clear directions, events and characters from the story. Make models of three objects which were important in the book you read. On a card attached to each model, tell why that object was important in the book. Design a movie poster for the book you read. Cast the major character in the book with real actors and actresses. Include a scene or dialogue from the book in the layout of the poster. If the book you read involves a number of locations within a country or geographical area, plot the events of the story on a map.

Make sure the map is large enough for us to read the main events clearly. Attach a legend to your map. Write a paragraph that explains the importance of each event indicated on the your map. Complete a series of five drawings that show five of the major events in the plot of the book you read.

Write captions for each drawing so that the illustrations can be understood by someone who did not read the book. Make a test for the book you read. Include 10 true-false, 10 multiple choice, and 10 short essay questions. After writing the test, provide the answers for your questions. Select one character from the book you read who has the qualities of a heroine or hero.

List these qualities and tell why you think they are heroic. Imagine that you are about to make a feature-length film of the novel you read. You have been instructed to select your cast from members of your English class. Cast all the major characters in your novel from your English classmates and tell why you selected each person for a given part.

Plan a party for the characters in the book you read. In order to do this, complete each of the following tasks: a Design an invitation to the party which would appeal to all of the characters. List five of the main characters from the book you read. Give three examples of what each character learned or did not learn in the book.

Lesson 1: History of storytelling

Obtain a job application from an employer in our area, and fill out the application as one of the characters in the book you read might do. Laughter also improves the immune system by releasing additional disease-fighting antibodies, and improves the oxygen in the blood. This additionally contributes to a healthy heart, as well as fight cancers and viruses, because it helps prevent the hardening of the arteries.

But maybe the most important aspect of laughter comes from a quote by the actor Alan Alda. He said, "When people are laughing, they're generally not killing each other. Step 1: Listen to the article, which is about four and a half minutes long. Listen only, and don't worry about understanding everything. Step 2: Listen once more, and try to understand the general information of each paragraph. In your head, explain a paragraph's main idea in one or two sentences.

Write your paragraph summaries after you have listened to the whole article. Listen again, check your answers, and compare your answers with a partner. Step 3: Look at the article, which has missing vocabulary words. Try to write any words that you remember from the listening. Listen once more, and write the missing words. Step 4: Read the article, and look up any unknown words. Now listen again. Can you understand more? Step 5: Listen! Listen to the article on the train or in your free time. Kundera's characters also totally dabble in revisionism on a personal level, hoping to "beautify" their life stories or return to a past that gave greater meaning and purpose to their existence.

In this sense, the "weight" of history is a good thing. Whenever anyone in this novel tries to shed the metaphysical pounds of the past, bad things happen. We've gotta to be honest: there's a pretty high creep factor in The Book of Laughter and Forgetting. The characters are neither particularly likeable nor particularly sympathetic, but they are characters living through extraordinary personal and historical turmoil and facing all the big questions each of us will face in our lifetimes.

These characters are finding ways to "survive crossing the desert of organized forgetting" VI. To death. To corruption.

To a bunch of creepy children on an island you can't ever escape. If that's not enough for you, though, it's also worthwhile to witness the fallout of another "Spring" reform movement—a granddaddy to the upheavals that we've seen in our own recent history across the Middle East and elsewhere.

If the past is a prelude to the present, then it would serve us well not to forget.

I Just Forgot by Mercer Mayer - Little Critter - Read Aloud Books for Children - Storytime

But there's even more than that. This novel is all about a couple of crucial things that make us who we are—our memories and our pasts. It's also about the weird lightness that comes about when we lose these things. A lightness that is symbolized by laughter. While Kundera is a big fan of memory, he's not a huge proponent of laughter.